What is a double cube proportion box?


Hi, I am hoping one of you will be able to help me. I have a book, "Box-Making Basics" and in it it has some "classical or traditional proportions, these include the double cube, the root-of-two box, the 1:2:3 box, and the golden rectangle." (p.4)
I don't understand what the double cube is. In the picture it has 1 1 2 where the height is 1, the width is 1 and the length is 2. What does this mean?
I really don't understand what any of them are. the double cube one just looked the easiest to understand.
Thank you.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sounds like it's the size of two cubes side by side. Whatever dimension you use for the height and width, the length is twice that.
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FWIW, first 3 members of a Fibonacci series.
Steve
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Some boxes look "nicer" than others. That's all it is about.
Over the years people have found that certain proportions in a box ( or shape) seem more pleasing to the eye than other proportions.
For the root two box think about the length of the hypotenuse in a 45 degree angle Square root of two as I recall. So you can draw a 45 deg. triangle, take the lengths of the sides, and use them as the proportions of the boxes. (Angles: 45, 90, 45) (Sides: 1 : 1.41 : 1)
The golden ratio 1.62 approx. is based on the Fibonacci series -- again which as I recall can be derived from looking at the natural branching of trees.
Just do a search on the Fibonacci series and the Golden Mean (ratio). You should be able to find lots of stuff.
These proportioned are used in architecture as well.
Have a look on my web site. There is a country style clock which was proportioned in root two ( 1:41 : 1) as to the various dimensions. It was sorta like that in an original design, but I reproportioned it to take the rule into account everywhere. It looks nicer now -- In my opinion.
Whether we have "learned" to like the proportions because a "wise man" told us we should, or we like them because there is a natural affinity for certain relations -- who knows? But people do like these proportions -- and that is what it is all about.
How do they work?
Well if you make a bottom dimension 10 inches, make the height 16 1/4 inches (1: 1:62 -- the golden ratio) -- or if you want root two, make the height 14 inches. Sometimes I double one side if I want the object to look stretched. Or I might design it in a size that is convenient to imagine and then divide everything by two, or three or any other number. (Or multiply... :-) )
It's that simple (or complicated) if you like.
The doubling rule (double one dimension to stretch one aspect) will always work I think. The mixing of ratio rules will probably create a "frankenbox". Try it -- maybe it works though! :-)
Beauty is in the mind of the beholder.
Welcome to number theory and architecture junction.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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