What glue's have you had luck with?

Page 2 of 2  


have a life.. Between about 50 hours of work a week, 4 nights of 3 hour classes, and 36 to 40 hours of homework, she doesn't sleep anymore...
Having put the RV in storage and can celled our netfliks subscription, I'm taking a positive approach to this and thinking that I have a 4 year window where I can spend all the time I want in the shop without worrying that she's becoming a "wood shop widow"..
I've done things with wood all my life, being raised in the sign business, but never had the knowledge or patience to try "finished" stuff.. I'm hoping that with a little more life under my belt, I can get rid of the "make it practical and don't worry about how it looks" attitude now and make nice stuff.. I realized years ago that this attitude was a method of avoiding the possibility of failure, if something didn't turn out "nice"..
My goal for now is to graduate from things like RV chock blocks (not a bad source of income and meeting folks, though) to things like jewelry boxes and things like that...
Mac
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Couple of time spenders for your idle times for finishing info www.homesteadfinishing.com www.woodfinishingsupplies.com and there are more out there.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Sep 2004 12:05:17 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net"
thanks, Bob... I book marked them for more sober nights.. *g*

Mac
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
>Is glue really permanent? Are different glues used for different >woods/applications?
I've had good luck with most glues I've used. Some cases, good and bad:
o construction adhesive: not alot of strength; my best use was in building up subfloors from several layers of plywood
o yellow glue (aliphatic resin?): no failures based on product; if glue was too old, or used improperly or outside intended use, bad results. Works on face joints, interlocking joints; woods, leather, stone, etc.
o resourcinol: very strong; poisonous before cured; can use in submerged application
o polyurethane: not very happy with this much-touted wonder glue. Several tubes I bought were in date but hardened before opening. When I did get a good tube, it was messy and not very strong.... This is totally anecdotal of course.
o Epoxy: when conditions are right -- good mix ratio, properly mixed, right application temperature, good surface prep, etc., can be very effective. Good strength and water resistance; may be submersible; fills gaps well, including making colored filler for wood or stone. DOES NOT withstand heat. Made some laminated parts combining brass and wood. Heat from sanding the brass flush to the wood caused bonding failure every time.
o Crazy/super glue (cyanoacrylate): must be fairly fresh; may be strong if applied correctly. Use top quality product for best results. (PS: don't get glued to a Rhino's butt -- http://www.darwinawards.com/legends/legends1999-07.html )
HTH,
/ts
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
3M 5200 in a tube where flexibility is a requirement, but bad in ridgid joints. For example, I used it in the wooden trunk lid frame of a 1930's car and the thing flopped all over the place, but would not let go. It's a boat sealant. Works great on teak, rosewood, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.