What glue do we like now?

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I just used up my quart of glue, and it is time to buy some more. I have like the GarrettWade 202, but have not tried Titebond III. Is it worth a try, or do I stick with 202?
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toller wrote:

Don't need Type III unless you need the lower temperature chalk point or the water resistance. It's roughly double the price of yellow glue.
Never used the Garrett Wade product so can't compare, but any good-quality yellow aliphatic is plenty strong enough for virtually any woodworking. "Ol' Yeller" from Woodworkers' Supply is somewhat less expensive and every bit as good as the name brands as near as I can tell, but there really isn't much cost differential unless you're into large-scale production.
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I've been very happy with Lee Valley 2000 GF. I've also used TBIII for outdoor use, but it is more expensive and not any better for indoor work. Ed
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almost identical. I will stay true; thanks.
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Gorilla glue.
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Never Enough Money wrote:

Bleech!!!
<Never> for ordinary woodworking unless absolutely mandatory for fullwaterproof would I <ever> use a polyurethane. (And, if you must, there are at least a couple other brands of the identical product cheaper than Gorilla...)
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Why would you "never" use a polyurethane glue?
It's strong. It's fast but not too fast. The squeeze out is easily removed. It's waterproof so if a grandchild spills a drink on it without you noticing, the joints don't fail (the finish may be damaged, though). It ain't that expensive. My gosh, it's peanuts compared to what we spend on other woodworking tools and supplies.
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Never Enough Money wrote:

Because it is over priced and under peckered.
You will never find that crap on a good boat.
If you need a gap filling adhesive that is also water proof, use epoxy with micro-balloons as a filler.
That won't fail when you really need it.
HTH
Lew
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 03:50:54 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Why would you use polyurethane glue for a gap-filling application, since it is specifically *not* a gap-filling glue?
"We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

I wouldn't use the stuff on a bet; however, that is being a smart alec and not answering your question.
To the best of my knowledge, Gorilla glue is an expanding product that supposedly will fill gaps, intensional or otherwise.
Maybe it isn't intended as a gap filling product, but it is very tempting to try to use it for one.
IMHO, based on the selling price structure of Gorilla glue, it is a very poor value when compared with epoxy and some low cost fillers on either a cost or performance comparison.
HTH
Lew
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at most 2mm gaps. but it's best to not have gaps in your work.
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    Greetings and Salutations....
On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 09:01:13 -0800, Steve Knight

    Hear, Hear! (of course this IS the sort of thing I would expect to hear from a maker of high-end tools *smile*).     There are a number of places were it is pointed out that the foam from poly glues have little or no structural strength...and, frankly, when I have used them for "gap filling", I find that I don't even like the look of the foam itself.     As for strength...I believe that the poly glues are all VERY strong...however, unlike the "yellow" glues, it is very brittle. That can cause problems in structures subject to strong impact.     As for what glues I use? Well, in no particular order, Titebond II, Yellow carpenters glue, epoxy, CA, poly, and "hot"...it depends on what I am trying to accomplish.     If I am gluing up a nice panel for a desktop, or raised panel door, I will tend to use the poly glues. They make a very good joint, and I have found that the foam-out does NOT soak into the wood surface as the yellow glues can. Also, even if it does, it is pretty much "stainable", so I can deal with the problem. ONe of the other posters mentioned something about how it stains one's fingers. This IS true, but, is pretty simple to deal with. Harbor Freight sells BIG boxes of nitrile gloves for small money that are comfortable to wear, resistant to tears and do a great job of keeping the stains off one's fingers.     If I am gluing up a bookcase with dovetail joints (for example), I will typically use a "yellow" glue, because it has decent open time, acts as a good lubricant for getting the joint together, and remains slightly "springy" and better at absorbing shocks without breaking.     If I am putting handles on turning tools, I really like epoxies (but not the 5 minute stuff). I also use it for inserting nuts into wood for "knock down" items.     CA (Cyanoacrylate) glues are great for stabilizing punky wood when I am turning something worm-eaten on the late, and, for putting a good, sealing finish on things like pens and goblets. Thicker versions work great for attaching dis-similar materials. The other day, for example, I used a couple drops to attach a small, plastic handle to a metal lid on a CD player to "help" get it opened.     Hot glues are great for temporary jig bits, for attaching stock to a faceplate for turning, and, for attaching small bits to larger stock for running through the shaper/router/tablesaw. If applied VERY hot, it is quite strong, but, easy to get off the item when it is removed.     Probably a slightly too-long-winded way of saying that I don't have a favorite glue...but find that each type has its own strengths and weaknesses.     By the by...I also have used hide glue (in bookbinding) and a couple of years ago, a buddy of mine picked up some white glue that had a tack time more akin to CA glue..and VERY strong bonding strength. That is pretty useful, although I am not sure that the manufacturer (whose name slips my mind, but, was putting the glue in bottles with really attractive blue labels) has managed to ramp up production.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Never Enough Money wrote:

It's no stronger (and some things I've seen indicate it's not as strong) than carpenter glues.
I find the squeeze out a pita -- w/ carpenter glues I can clean up before it dries critical places and it it's an easily surfaced rough joint, still no advantage.
I've never had any joint fail under that circumstance...I suppose possible, but never seen it in practice.
True, but why spend twice what's needed for it?
Plus, my real dislikes--
It foams It discolors/stains and is virtually impossible to remove from skin It takes "forever" to set and thus requires excessively long clamping times Did I mention it's expensive? :)
That said, I was thinking after I posted I should have put a couple of caveats in...
I have used it to some extent on exterior repair or similar where the extra water-resistance was desirable and the even more expensive two-part epoxies seemed excessive.
It is also (as someone else noted) of use for some assemblies that require long open times for assembly (although most of those have better alternatives imo) and mostly likely use is for location where need an inflexible glue line such as the formed laminate same poster noted.
For "ordinary" woodworking, it just has far more drawbacks than advantages.
IMO, YMMV, $0.02, etc., ...
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I still use Elmer's Woodworkers Glue, 90% of the time. I've always wanted to try the "poly" glues but backed off when I saw the price and shelf life.
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Phisherman wrote:

Good choice unless you've a specific need...
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Fri, Mar 4, 2005, 1:31am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@noone.com (Phisherman) says: I still use Elmer's Woodworkers Glue, 90% of the time. I've always wanted to try the "poly" glues but backed off when I saw the price and shelf life.
I figure any of the glues would work. But, I've been using Titebond II for so long, I can't remember when I started using it, or what made me try it. But, I like the results, so don't see any reason for me to change. I "have" used Elmers white glue, it worked, but for whatever reason prefer the Titebond II.
I tried some poly. Once. Worked adequately, but nothing thrilling, didn't do anything for me the Titebond II wouldn't do, as well, or better. Besides the initial higher cost, after a not too long period of time (very few weeks), it hardened in the tube. Nevermore, nevermore.
If anyone wants to know what brand of glue to use, best way is to just go out and buy the smallest bottles available of each you're curious about, try 'em, and see which you like best. That way you'll know for sure. That's probably what I did when I first converted to Titebond. I did use I for awhile, but then went to II
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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I made a jig to store it upside down and put it in the fridge in the garage. Kept better but still short shelf life for amount I was using.

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I bet bloxegen would really help. not sure though as I use up bottles before they go bad.
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wrote:

true for daily use it is not practical. but there are not other brands that are as good. gorilla is the only one as much solids. plus it has no thinners and it has a longer open time. I tested most of them and for oily woods it was stronger then any other brand.
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Steve Knight wrote:

I've used it and the Elmer's (I think???) side by side and could tell no discernable difference.
Did not try w/ oily woods, however, granted...there could/would be an application I didn't account for. (I retreat to my use of "ordinary", however...) :)
See my other response to see at least a slight moderation on the previous post...
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