weight of plywood


Does anyone know the approx. wt of a treated 4x8 3/4" sheet of plywood? I'm making a box for my forklift and need to figure my max wt lift. Thanks in advance.
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80-100lbs if still wet
That said, if you are operating your fork lift to within the weight of a piece of plywood of its limits, you are operation in dangerous territory.
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On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 13:11:06 GMT, "Evon Barvinchack"

Since the species and moisture content are unknown the worst case would be to assume it's 100% water. The volume is 2 cu ft, so figure the weight as 2 * 62 lb.
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Thanks for your replies. I want to plug in the wt of a worker, tools, material and the wt of plywood box. I wanted to make sure that the total weight did'nt exceed it's safe lift capacity. As the plywood dries it will become lighter. Just trying to out smart "Murphy's Law"!
wrote: > > >Does anyone know the approx. wt of a treated 4x8 3/4" sheet of plywood? I'm > >making a box for my forklift and need to figure my max wt lift. Thanks in > >advance. > > Since the species and moisture content are unknown the worst case > would be to assume it's 100% water. The volume is 2 cu ft, so figure > the weight as 2 * 62 lb.
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On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 14:38:02 +0000, Evon Barvinchack wrote:

Workers should not be elevated on the forks of a forklift. A forklift doesn't have a holding (lock) valve in the lift system and is not designed for a person to be on or under forks if elevated. If some one gets hurt you will be open to some major legal problems if in the U.S.. You can rent "manlifts" and "safety harness plus lanyard" for hoisting personal.
Check with a local forklift dealer or a rental outfit that supplies construction equipment for more info. It's worth having the right tool for the job in the first place.
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Not if he is employing illegal aliens. They are not likely to sue.
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not necessarily so....
http://www.libertymatters.org/newsservice/2005/faxback/2873_Ranch.htm
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couillion wrote:

Given that two of the defendants didn't even defend themselves and the third settled out of court that isn't much of a 'precedent'.
Back in the early days of the Icelandic Allthing there were basicly two punishments. One was a fine. For example, if someone murdered your brother they might be required to pay you 200 pieces of gold. But if you wound up supporting his widow and children, or if the murder was particularly foul, like backstabbing then that might be increased. OTOH, if your brother was kind of a jerk the fine might be reduced and if he had it comming to him, no compensation would be required.
The second punishment was outlawry. If the wrongdoer could not pay or refused to pay the fine then he was declared an outlaw which meant you could kill him and not be fined.
Outlawry has long passed into the history books. Today, no matter how evil a person is, it is still possible to commit a crime (or a tort) against him and be punished for it.
Not to conclude that the defendants in the suit above actually did committ the tort in question but if someone does commit a tort agains an illegal alien there is no reason why they should not be allowed to sue, same as anybody else, and then be deported right after they collect.
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FF


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stoutman wrote:

I too, know of some efforts to extend legal help "paperless" workers with worker's comp issues.
er
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Or you can review the regs. It's ok to lift people with a forklift if
a) They are on a lifting platform that is secured to the lift <<and>> b) That platform has a proper guardrail.
With the proper rail, a harness isn't required.
http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id !322
Running out to rent a scissor lift or some equivilent peice of machinery every time a lightbulb needed changing would really put a ding in a small shop's budget.
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snipped-for-privacy@bloomer.net wrote:

And shame if you don't. Like the guys in this German safety video.
http://media.hugi.is/hahradi/fyndnar/STAPLERFAHRERKLAUSDERERSTEA.wmv
Endure the opening scenes, the real fun starts around 01:45.
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Or you can review the regs. It's ok to lift people with a forklift if
a) They are on a lifting platform that is secured to the lift <<and>> b) That platform has a proper guardrail.
With the proper rail, a harness isn't required.
http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id !322
Running out to rent a scissor lift or some equivilent peice of machinery every time a lightbulb needed changing would really put a ding in a small shop's budget.
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go w/ 90
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