Very cool, but expensive...

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaN-Emvizq8

-Jim
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On 10/26/15 6:32 PM, Jim wrote:

I've seen that a couple times before. Looks impressive, but every time I watch the videos it doesn't seem to close the gaps very tightly.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 10/26/2015 5:32 PM, Jim wrote:

doesn't know about your joinery method?
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"Just Wondering" wrote in message

From what I see on the TV renovation shows that is what large hammers are for...
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On 10/27/2015 8:08 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

cabinets. I have renovated a few kitchens and felt it was much easier to remove 2~4 attachment screws, per cabinet, and carry the cabinet out whole. They still have to remove the attachment screws when destroying the cabinets.
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wrote:

But it is TV you need images that move.
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wrote:

I've always found it easier to remove sheetrock in large sections, rather than pounding it to smithereens, too.
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"krw" wrote in message

Yeah... they create work! But I guess smashing stuff makes for better TV and makes some people feel better. ;~)
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On 10/27/2015 4:02 AM, Just Wondering wrote:

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On Tue, 27 Oct 2015 02:02:44 -0600

depends on the someone i can imagine a couple of scenarios
i think it is glued together and it is too heavy to carry sorry i cannot help
i think it is glued together i can make the pieces so they will fit through the door or smaller and then we can glue it back together
it is too big to move i think we leave it here and i never liked it anyway since it has gotten to be wobbly over the years and we could never figure out how to tighten it up
we should put it on craigslist and tell them to bring strong people and a good dolly no one will ever think hey it is using the invis system and absolutely no one will have that magnetic tool
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I totally fail to see any practical application for it. It's a neat gimmick, but definately falls into the category of solutions looking for a problem.
John
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On 10/27/2015 9:12 AM, John McCoy wrote:

They would be handy for upper end displays like those used at conventions that are assembled and disassembled often . But obviously the person doing the dismantling would have to know where all of the fasteners are located.
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On 10/27/2015 10:24 AM, Leon wrote:

I saw Tom Silva of This Old House use the system to fasten pieces of a stairway banister together.
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On 10/27/2015 10:12 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Yeah I saw that on TOH several years ago. One has to wonder how tight the connection can be, the force of a magnet is about all the force that there is to turn the screw.
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On 10/27/2015 1:43 PM, Leon wrote:

It would also depend on the pitch of the screw threads. I have wondered about the "tightness" too. Maybe there are tests?
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On 10/27/2015 2:11 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

The company's site claims:
"Powerful screwed connections with 250 kg clamping force per connector via the M5 stainless steel screw"
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I am a little sceptical of that(*), but also bear in mind that that's just a tad over 500lbs, which isn't much. You can get 1000lbs clamping force with a regular Jorgensen bar clamp, and several tons with a 3/4 pipe clamp.
(* that's about 1/3 the shear strength of the screw, if I'm not mistaken, so it's in the realm of what a human with a screwdriver could accomplish.)
John
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Why? Banisters have been made for centuries without that system, it seems hard to think of a good reason to use it (other than to show off, I guess).

I think the actual problem you'd have is the two metal pieces have to be absolutely perpendicular to the surface to get a tight joint. Which basically means you have to drill all the holes on the drill press.
Dowels tend to do that too, but at least you have a little give with them to accomodate minor errors. That thing is effectively a steel dowel when it's joined, and there's no give.
John
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On 10/27/2015 5:36 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Good logic. They were made without power tools too so there is no good reason to use them either.
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Well, I can think of good reasons to use power tools (less sweating onto the workpiece, for example). I'm not seeing a good reason why this expensive and complicated fastner is better than traditional ways of fastening the parts of a bannister.
John
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