Varnish and lacquer

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Dear Experts,
What do people here know about the different types of varnish, lacquer and other clear gloss wood finishes?
I have made a small object from black walnut and I would like to finish it with a very high-gloss surface. One option that I've considered is spray-on varnish (which describes itself as polyurethane). Internet research (i.e. the Wikipedia "Lacquer" page) tells me that there are also lacquers based on acrylic and other materials. A friend has shown me something that he has given a very deep high-gloss finish to using epoxy resin! What is the best way to get a good result, without needing years of practice?
Thanks for any suggestions,
Phil.
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Polyurethane is pretty much idiot proof for a beginner. Next step is to learn how to use a buff.
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It is? Sand some between coats and tell me what you find.
Stain and poly are their own punishment.
-- A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world. -- John Locke
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"Phil Endecott" wrote:

Enough to get into trouble. -----------------------------------

Most are done in lacquer.
Since the project is small, a couple of rattle cans of high gloss lacquer should do the job.
Where is Robert when you need him?
Ahoy Nailshooter.
You out there?
Lew
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Yes, that's the sort of thing that I have in mind, except showing the wood rather than blackness.

Could you perhaps post a link to the product that you have in mind? My searches mainly find sprays to go over metalic car paint, and I doubt that's the same thing.
Thanks, Phil.
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You didn't say what the "small object" is, so a definitive recommendation can't be made. Shellac is fine...for some things, but it may have to be waxed to protect it from some things that attack shellac.
You could use Deft Brushing Lacquer (it comes in an aerosol, but I like brushes for fussy work), which is harder and more impervious. Multiple coats, with fine sanding in between can be easily done in a day. http://www.deftfinishes.com/trade/products/clear-wood-finish-brushing-lacquer
R
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I went through gallons of Deft. Cool stuff. A bit stinky but lies down nicely. But I have never attempted a high gloss (wet look). I have used acrylic clear coat for that with great success. Expensive though.
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Phil Endecott wrote the following:

Rustoleum, Krylon, TrueValue, Plastikote and some others all make gloss black lacquer spray paint. just google gloss black lacquer spray
Here's one http://www.destinationpaint.com/11OZ-Gloss-Black-Lacquer-Spray-Paint-p/688002.htm
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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But I don't want black, I want clear.
My local hardware shop has a shelf of Plastikote spray products including the clear PU varnish that I mentioned before, and another product that seems intended to be applied over a matt painted finish to make it glossy.
Cheers, Phil.
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Phil Endecott wrote the following:

Oh, Sorry. I guess I was distracted by Lew's mention of black jewelry boxes.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Phil Endecott wrote:

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&cp=9&gs_id=y&xhr=t&q=spray+lacquer&pf=p&sclient=psy-ab&source=hp&pbx=1&oq=spray+lac&aq=0&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp 261d47fa93f09&biw2&bihX0
--

dadiOH
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That mainly finds the stuff for covering metalic car paint, and stuff for fingernails...
There are a few products like this one:
http://www.axminster.co.uk/chestnut-chestnut-acrylic-lacquer-spray--400ml-prod19762 /
which claim to be "acrylic lacquer". Is that the sort of thing you have in mind?
Cheers, Phil.
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Phil Endecott wrote:

It finds... Rustoleum Permalac Moeller Marine Ace Watco Behlen Qualalacq
And via the "spray clear lacquer" link at the bottom, Krylon and others. It also links sites for info about using them. You can also find various brands at any Home Depot or Lowes. _________________________

http://www.axminster.co.uk/chestnut-chestnut-acrylic-lacquer-spray--400ml-prod19762 /
As far as I am concerned, "lacquer" is a material such as nitrocellose that will redissolve in its thinner. I don't hink acrylic does that.
--

dadiOH
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Thanks, I'll look them up.
(FYI, Google returns different results depending on your geographical location and other factors.)
Phil.
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Phil Endecott wrote:

Yeah, the posted link was what Google gave for my location; nevertheless, it gave all I mentioned and they are available everywhere.
--

dadiOH
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Shellac. Orange / amber gives a nice warm tone to newly surfaced walnut (or cherry), which can be a bit on the cold side, unlike the wood that's had 50+ years to age that you're trying to imitate. To get high gloss, let cure for a week or three, then wet sand through 600 and rub out -- same with lacquer. Varnish is a great protective finish, beautiful rubbed out to satin, but you'll never get as high a gloss as you can with shellac (you can fill and French polish an ash baseball bat so that it literally feels like glass, smooth and cold) or lacquer, even the Minwax brush-on stuff. Too soft. A coat of paste wax to truly finish the job knocks the gloss up a notch more.
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On 9/19/2011 5:18 PM, Phil Endecott wrote:

Something from experience, regardless of the finish used the higher the gloss the more the imperfections, low & high spots, and coarseness of grain will show, like a sore thumb. Your surface must be perfect.
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I've found this page, which seems to be comprehensive:
http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/finishing.htm
Any thoughts?
Phil.
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Phil Endecott wrote:

Regarding its notes about spraying lacquer, I would skip stain, sanding sealer and sanding between coats (unless you got crud in it). I would also pass on anything water base; as I said elsewhere, I want lacquer to re-dissolve in its thinner, makes life world's easier.
--

dadiOH
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I've spent the last week waiting for a can of spray lacquer to arrive - somehow I managed to choose a very slow supplier...
I've now tried it on a small test piece, and I've put a photo here:
http://chezphil.org/tmp/lacquer.jpeg
That is after very very many "thin coats". Maybe my idea of "thin" is too thin; they were thin enough that the solvent had evaporated and it seemed dry in under a minute. Even after all these coats, as you can see there are still many "dimples" over the pores in the grain. I have the impression that if I put on some thicker coats it would smooth over those holes, but that might have some adverse effects.
I am now wondering if "sanding sealer", or some other product, is needed first to block up these pores first.
Or alternatively, some sort of wax or oil could do the same job. I considered applying some sort of oil first but my feeling was that I was happy with the natural colour. Oil might improve the colours, or I might regret using it. (My local store seems to have lots of Danish Oil, but I don't think I saw any Tung Oil.)
Or perhaps I am supposed to sand it to remove these dimples before applying more coats?
Any thoughts?
Phil.
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