unexpected introduction to kickback

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If you are crosscutting and the wood goes anyware near a splitter you need to TURN THE SAW OFF and learn to read a good book on safe use of the table saw.
You have been very very lucky. Your luck is not likely to be as good in the long run.
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Why would the wood passing the splitter cause a problem - with cross cutting or with ripping?
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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On 23 Sep 2005 16:40:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why ? What's the problem with crosscutting in conjunction with either a splitter or a riving knife ?
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That sure sounds like using the miter gage and fence at the same time. Don't do that.

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CW,
I do believe that's what I might have done. Can someone explain why that happens ? Unknowingly, this had to be an idiotic thing to do but please refrain from insults . I just wasn't aware of it.
Thanks
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"edog" wrote in message

http://www.woodcraft.com/articles.aspx?articleid17
http://www.cariboo.bc.ca/hsafety/procedures/list/tablesaw.html
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Last update: 9/17/05
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Kickback happens the rear of the saw blade makes (significant) contact with the workpiece or offcut. The front of the blade pushes down and forward (this is good). The back of the blade pushes *UP* and forward (this is bad).
When things are going right, the back of the blade rides in the kerf (the hole you just cut in the board). When workpiece or cutoff twists in such a way that the back of the blade can makes contact, then the wood is lifted and thrown forward (kickback).
In your specific situation, if the offcut is trapped between the rip fence and the blade. A little bit of vibration can cause the offcut to touch the blade. Think about what happens then that offcut rotates counter-clockwise. (Try this in slow motion with the saw turned off if you must) The leading edge of that offcut pinches even more and makes better contact with the rear of the blade, resulting in P-twang! The next thing you know, your bowel feels refreshingly unencumbered.
Always let your offcut fall away from the blade; never trap it.
-Steve

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This is much more helpful than the other "You are doing it wrong, but the right way is a secret" replies.

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Guess it's time to post this url again. Most of what's been said, plus some AND diagrams with colors and arrows.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/KickBack1.html
Lacking a sliding table for the table saw, it's probably much safer to just get and use a miter saw - with hold downs.
BTW - NEVER use a miter saw to cut WITH the grain. If you think a table saw kickback is scary, you'll be absolutely terrified, when you stop bleeding and regain consciousness. DAMHIKT - but the metal fence on my 12" SCMS had to be replaced
charlie b
better to gain and actually use knowledge than to become a familiar face at the local emergency room.
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Ok, I am assuming you tried to rip (with grain) with a scms. Not that I'd ever try it anyway, but please explain how it is more dangerous than crosscutting operation. Thanks
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Using miter gauge and FENCE with narrow stuff can catch/trap the wood between the fence and the blade, and bingo - kickback
You CAN use the fence and a miter gauge together safely, just clamp a short piece of plywood/etc to the fence at least 6inched in front of the forward edge of the blade, so that you reference for repeated cuts on the added piece of wood on the fence, but your 2x4 (or whatever) is clear of the added wood when it finishes the cut - thus the cutoff is no longer able to be trapped between the fence and the blade
John

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edog wrote:

Pendel: "...and do we dress to the right or left sir?... "
Osnard: "Never know where the bloody thing is. Bobs around like a wind sock."
http://www.dvd.net.au/review.cgi?review_id 03
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