Turning advice needed.

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Just another observation--this is a shift knob IIRC. Unless it's completely symmetrical you want it threaded in a manner that lets the alignment be adjusted--if the threads are cut in the wood then it may be necessary to shim or trim it until it aligns just right, if it's a threaded insert the insert can be turned a little bit as needed, if it's a press in insert then the insert can be placed on the shifter and then the knob pressed on.
Here's another option: <(Amazon.com product link shortened) 05625/dp/B003S1RU6A>
If you want the full installation kit with the purpose-made drill, tap, counterbore, etc it's a bit expensive <(Amazon.com product link shortened) 16-Thread-Repair-0562/dp/B001JK7ZZS>
I suspect that just drilling a tight hole and using anchoring epoxy will be sufficient with the 3/4 inch long insert though.
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On Thu, 31 Dec 2015 12:38:37 -0500, "J. Clarke"

Shifter knobs generally use jam nuts to tighten and orient them.

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On 12/29/2015 07:42 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Is the shift lever on the floor or the tree? If the floor, you won't see the hole as it will be on the underside.
--
Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
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On Tuesday, December 29, 2015 at 8:20:43 AM UTC-8, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Easy, would be to get a bit of square steel rod (1/2 x 1/2), drill and thread it, and fit that into a square mortise that you open up from a 1/2" drilled hole. When it slides in easily, add hotmelt glue and assemble (this glue ought to be weak enough that you could disassemble nondestructively).
Alternately, drill a hexagonal hole for the nut (drill it round, vise/chisel to make a hexagonal mortise), or heat a hexagonal item of the right size and press the red-hot metal into the wood...
If you have a metal lathe, you can make a turned insert that has the right clearance hole to engage an inch or so of the shaft, with a threaded end, and knurl the whole thing. I wouldn't force-fit it, though (like many threaded inserts), because the wood might decide to split.
I think many shift knobs are made with through holes, and the open end is capped with a nice logo-endplug, after you get it secured.
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When I was doing a bit of teaching in our local woodturning club, "knobs" o f all types was one of the things I taught. I had my own method, and guys that learned it turned gear shift knobs, fine furniture knobs, and decorati ve knobs of all types.
Take your blank, orient it the way you want to get the cosmetic appearance right. Take the end that will be the bottom and take it to your drill pres s. Drill a hole deep enough to accommodate your screw inserts. For a gear shift, I usually used two to three nuts of the correct thread size, depend ing on how long the threaded section was on the shifter.
Take a hex head bolt that is the same thread size as your nuts/shifter, and cut it off about an 1 1/2" above the threads. Using a machine oil like 3in 1, wipe the bolt threads down with a generous amount of oil with special at tention on the end of the bolt. Put the nuts on the end of the bolt. (You can also use a single piece of all thread connector if you can find the rig ht size.) Epoxy your hole, and insert the oiled bolt (oiled to prevent epox y adhesion) with the nuts on it into your wood block.
Allow to cure. I usually wait about 12 hours or overnight.
The next day, you now have something that looks like a popsicle.
I have a couple of these, and if you don't have a #2 Morse taper (for mid s ized lathes, #3 for larger) with a chuck on it to hold small stuff you need one.
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-half-inch-mt2-mini-lathe-drill-chuck-42340 .html
Put the bolt end in the chuck, and bring your tailstock up to stead the end . Turn out your shape and do most of your sanding. If you will put the in sert slightly below the finished end to be screwed on to the shifter, you c an finish the profile, fine cuts and sanding and never expose the inserts.
When you are 99% through turning, turn off the lathe and back off the tails tock. Since you turned the knob to the insert, it is now perfectly centere d, perfectly concentric, and balanced. It will spin easily and true, and y ou can cut off the mark left by the tailstock pin. Sand and finish, and yo u are done.
I finish some things on the lathe using burned on finishes, and when doing that I finish, then spin off the completed knob while the chuck is holding the bolt. For larger things like gear shift knobs, I take them off the lat he, loosen the bolt ( make sure there is no epoxy adhesion0, then leave the bolt loosely in the knob. I use the bolt like a stem, and simply stick it z(with the knob in it) in a hole drilled in a piece of scrap so I can spra y finish on it.
Doing it this way means you do the entire process safely. No hand holding of wood, no foam or rubber gizmos, no jigs to be made, no through holes or any of that. The finished product looks 100% professional and after your i nserts are set, you can turn out a finished knob in literally minutes.
It's easy, too.
Robert
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Ivan Vegvary wrote:

If the hole will be cross grain, drill and tap will work; if with the grain, you'll need a threaded insert.
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On 12/29/2015 10:20 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Something to consider. Wine bottle stoppers with turned decorative pieces are simply screwed straight on to the threads of the metal stopper. I would imagine that your shifter will have a considerably larger and longer threads.
Tap scrap and see how secure it is on the shifter be fore turning.
If this is secure enough mount a blank on a 5/16" bolt with the head cut off and mount in lathe drill chuck and turn.
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On 12/29/2015 11:20 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

For a gear shift knob I would use a brass insert, and get a nice nut brass, to lock the knob to the shifter.
--
Jeff

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On 12/29/2015 11:20 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

I would simply drill and tap it. You might be surprised how well a simple 5/16" tapped thread works in hardwood.
Use a slightly undersized drill for the hole, do it on a test piece first. If you have a drill chuck for your lathe, then you can drill and tap it on the lathe. If you are afraid the threads won't hold (they will) you can put in some super glue after tapping and then re-tap the threads.
I think this would be better than the standard threaded inserts because they typically are not very long and provide less support, particularly lateral support needed on a shift knob.
Very simple to do and should work w/o much fuss.
--
Jack
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Even a "fine" thread? I wouldn't think there'd be much thread to hold in wood.

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krw wrote:

It would be fine as long as the threaded hole is perpendicular to the grain.
If parallel to the grain the tap will shear/break off much of the threads as it cuts. That is true even with larger NC threads. There are various ways to fix that but the easiest thing is to drill a larger than needed hole, fill it with thickened epoxy or JB Weld or similar, let it set then drill and tap the epoxy.
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On 12/31/2015 8:43 AM, Jack wrote:

Exactly, the insert suggestions are cool but simply making it complicated IMHO.

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Make sure it is comfortable in the hand during use. A pointed top should be avoided.
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On Tuesday, December 29, 2015 at 10:20:43 AM UTC-6, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

readed 5/16" 24 tpi. Have tap.

"x24 nut. If embed rhen how?

uce a small spiral. Have not glued together yet, nor have I cut the narrow 1/8" or so strip of wood.

Threaded insert is a good option. But do it the easy way, put the insert i n FIRST, then chuck up a bolt or threaded rod, thread the insert and blank on and turn your gear shift knob. You KNOW the insert is both dead centere d and perpendicular to the gear shift.
Deb
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And to add to that sage advise, use another nut to double nut the insert while turning. Then it won't rattle off or move while turning. The nut can be remove on the car, but I think I would have it there as well.
Martin
On 1/4/2016 9:57 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

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On Tue, 29 Dec 2015 08:20:36 -0800 (PST)

depends
how long is the threaded shaft what kind of wood does the shaft have a collar that the knob cinches to
i might go all the way thru the knob and put a nut on the top and put a nut on the shaft and have the nut recessed into the knob bottom
use thin nuts
epoxy the nut in the knob top
then i would find an old pontiac key fob and use clear epoxy to cover the top nut with the key fob
this way you only have a 5/16 hole in the knob with recess at top and bottom for the nuts
drilling it depends on what tools you have
this is a case where drilling the hole first is best before turning
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2015 08:20:36 -0800 (PST)

what happened to the first one you made
or did you never make it
a year ago you asked the same
which model pontiac is it anyway
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