True Position Drill Guide Follow Up

I took a week vacation and am back drilling holes. Specificity the 31 shelf positions for both entertainment center towers. That comes to 248 holes for both towers. Using the drill guide with the shelf pin gang attachment took me 95 seconds to place, clamp into position, and drill the first run of 20 or so holes.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/15495059216/
Removing the clamps, indexing with a drill bit, reclamping, and drilling to finish the other 11 or so holes took an additional 80 seconds. So just under 3 minutes per row for setting up and drilling 31 holes was pretty quick compared to my other methods.
The results.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/15515077941/in/photostream/
All in all I am pretty happy with the True Position Drill Guide and its shelf pin extensions.
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On Sunday, October 12, 2014 2:25:12 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

That has to be a great time saver. I remember when I used to build cabinet s and someone would want holes for shelf supports in certain areas. I woul d only do about eight to ten a side inside a cabinet, and that was a PIA so metimes to get straight and square. So on consideration, the numbers you a re talking about would have no doubt swamped my canoe. Thankfully, that wa sn't the style then, so even with built in units, there weren't that many h oles. Nothing like your pictures which really provide some perspective on just how many you drilled!
When I was still building, for those that wanted the finel adjustable shelv ing I always used these:
http://www.cabinetparts.com/g/255-series-steel-pilasters-clips-knape-and-vo gt
No doubt you have used your share of those! I liked them because they were a kill shot for ease of installation. Run the router against the guide al ong the length of the casing side, flip it around, do the same, and then sc rew the pilaster in. Easy! Better still, if we had the table saw out on t he job the dado blade made short work of that slotting requirement. And if you used the same index to set all four of them, they were always square an d in adjustment.
They came in brass, antique brass, white, walnut, brown, tan, from the fact ory and had clips to match. Roll down that page linked above and you can s ee the clips with the rubber pads we used to use for glass shelving.
Waaaaaaaay back then people didn't want holes with pegs or some kind of cli p that fit in a drilled hole. They thought it looked amateurish (even thou gh significantly harder to get right) to have all the holes, and didn't wan t folks to think they had cabinets built in someone's garage as a hobby. S ome thought it looked to much like the manufactured Danish furniture you bo ught in a box and assembled at your house (think before IKEA invaded the US A).
Fast forward to now, and holes are back in fashion as my cabinet guy tells me his clients think they add a hand crafted touch. He builds his cabinets and will have a few holes drilled in a compartment that allow adjustable s helving to be used.
Haven't seen him in a while. I should look him up and show him your hole j ig.
Robert
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On 10/15/2014 11:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

built it about 33 years ago. ;~) Next time you are out I'll show it to you.
Here is the manufacturer web site. Friendly guy and very helpful with information on his product.
http://www.precisioncasewerk.com/products.html
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