TO USE OR NOT TO USE - BLADE STABILIZERS???



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I am curious as to what the opinion of the group is regarding using Freud / DeWalt / Forrest Blade Stabilizers. I have researched the archives and there doesnt seem to be a conclusive opinion either for or against using them. I am not experiencing any real problems with my Delta 10 Contractors Table saw But I can always use improvements if they are worth the money the hassle and if they really work you know not a gimmick. If I should get them do you recommend single or double stabilizers??
Thanks in advance for your advice - its appreciated.
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Joe Shea
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TO USE OR NOT TO USE - BLADE STABILIZERS???What sort of improvement are you looking for, if you are not experiencing any problems?
Sounds like you are just looking for a gadget to buy.
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TO USE OR NOT TO USE - BLADE STABILIZERS???In this case, don't fix it. :-)
Brian.
I am not experiencing any real problems with my Delta 10" Contractor's Table saw
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TO USE OR NOT TO USE - BLADE STABILIZERS???I don't recommend using DeWalts stabilizer. I did and it trashed a brand new Freud combo blade. While setting up my Delta cab saw for accuracy using dial indicators (you won't see the side effects using squares) I checked the face of the blade and found that it was bowed outwards or away at both ends. I removed the blade stabilizer and checked the flatness of the blade side and sure enough it was concaved ".005 at the center and reading the packaging confirms this DeWalt for some reason feels that this is approiate to control blade warpage, but I disagree especially since my new blade has a permeniate warp now. Forrest has the better approach theirs is flat within ".001and this is what I will use when my Forrest WWII blade gets installed. Good Luck
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TO USE OR NOT TO USE - BLADE STABILIZERS???If you've got a noisy blade, they'll quiet it a bit. You lose a bit of depth in the cut, but that's tolerable. I've got one on mine now because it's a better washer than that pressed crap that came with it.
I am curious as to what the opinion of the group is regarding using Freud / DeWalt / Forrest Blade Stabilizers. I have researched the archives and there doesn't seem to be a conclusive opinion either for or against using them. I am not experiencing any real problems with my Delta 10" Contractor's Table saw - But - I can always use improvements - if they are worth the money - the hassle and if they really work - you know - not a gimmick. If I should get them - do you recommend single or double stabilizers??
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My 2 cents worth. I've read responses from those who use stabilizer and think they are great. I'm using a Forrest WWII and their stabilizer but don not see much difference betw. using and not using a stabilizer. Probabbly if you're using a blade which may not be balanced would make a difference. I'm always for whatever works for you keep doing it!!!!
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I don't remember what brand of stabilizers I have, but they were the best investment I made for my old Crapsman CS. With the stamped steel only on one side(original), it had quite a bit of wobble in the blade. Put on a set of stabilizers, reduced runout a *lot*, makes a much nicer saw. I do have to remove the inner one if using a dado blade though.
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TO USE OR NOT TO USE - BLADE STABILIZERS???I have the Forrest WWII blade. I use their stabilizer and am very happy with the setup.
Jim www.woodblog.com
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TO USE OR NOT TO USE - BLADE STABILIZERS???Let me throw in another thought to see if anyone else has tried it. Oldham, and others, sell some pretty nice 8, 8-1/4 fine kerf, carbide blades for around $15-18. When working with 4/4 stock and blade stabilizers they do a great job of providing a clean cut and provide minimal kerf cut on my 10" cabinet saw. The stabilizers provide stiffness out to the edge of the cutting range.
This provides an economical alternative to the bigger blades for precision work.
Anyone else?
Ron
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[...]

How big are the flanges on the arbor? On my Metabo TS (20 years old) the flanges have a diameter of about 12cm, so i don't see the need for an extra blade stabilizer.
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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I've had a forest WWII on my Ryobi bt3000 for a few years now, cuts like glass. When I bought the blade at a WW show, the gentleman from forest asked the type of saw and sold me a thin kerf blade, based on my machines' horsepower I'm sure. Also sold me a stabilizer, he said because it smooths out the thin kerf blade. I have cut both with and without the stabilizer with no percieved difference in cut, noise, etc. The cut is only marginally better than the stock Ryobi blade that came with the saw. What amazes me is that, one day with little else to do, I measured the arbor runout on that saw (off the edge of the blade I had verified was FLAT) and found over .005 runout, but I STILL get glasslike cuts, both cross and rip. I agonized for days over buying a new saw to remedy the situation, then finally realized it's the CUT, stoopid. Kicked myself and went back to work.
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I think a lot depends on how thick the body of the blade is. I bought a Ridge blade at a woodworkers show and because it was much thicker then the Forrest they did not recommend stabilizers.
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I've got a WWII and a stabilizer. I feel using the stabilizer is like gilding the lily. With or without it, the cuts are great. Using it reduces the maximum depth of cut.
David
Joseph E. Shea, Jr. wrote:

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