Titebond Glue


For years, I been using Elmer's WW'ing Glue. Then for about less than a year, I stopped with WW'ing (school and other things). Now, I am back (raised panels this time). As I was playing around with samples, I realized all my glues (including the Gorilla) were all dried up. So, a quick run to Rockler and bought a 4oz regular Titebond glue. I noticed Titebond expand their selections. So, few questions for those who may experienced the new stuff.
1) Titebond Dark Wood Glue, is it good for red oak? Just want to know if it helps with the color or not?
2) Titebond Original Wood Glue, same thing as Elmer's WW'ing Glue.
3) Titebond II (and III) is for outdoor and waterproofing.
4) As I read the Titebond website, they even recommend wetting the surface with water for the Original Glue. So, I should do the same for Elmer's, just like Gorilla Glue emphasis it?
I have not used Gorilla Glue (only once, it was free). I wonder if I should use Gorilla Glue for red oak, that it would act as a filler too in gaps we overlook? Does the Gorilla Glue swell the work (move the wood?) or it only bubbles out of joints?
I am feeling about switching to Titebond Original, but it's not an issue.
Chuck
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Never use Gorilla to fill gaps for structural reasons, as it doesn't provide any strength in the foamy portion. You need good tight joints when using Gorilla glue just as with PVA. Use Epoxy to fill loose fitted joints instead. (Or fix the joint before glue up time.)
Good question on the dark wood glue for red oak--I carefully clean up the yellow glue from my red oak projects. I hate it when I miss a spot!
Dave
CNT wrote:

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Titebond makes a tintable glue, but I'm wondering out loud why one can't tint TBII with water based tints like Wizard tints (very concentrated WB dyes in liquid form by J.E. Moser).
Dave
CNT wrote:
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Chuck, I have several adhesives that I use for 'home' and 'shop'.
Typically, I use the 'Liquid Hide Glue' {a Franklin product}for minor furniture repair. It is water soluble, because I know the chair might need to be 'de-constructed' at some time in the future. Also it is the 'gentlest' of my glues.
I have done away with the Elmers White & Woodworking because it is redundant . . . I have 'standardized' on the Titebond II {another Franklin product}. It is used both on household projects and in the shop. Should some small samples of III, gotten at a recent Industrial Woodworkers show, prove as good, that will replace it.
For 'serious' work, I use EPOXY. Depending on the fillers I mix with the resin, I have a VERY WIDE range of charistics I can create for the job at hand. I can not speak with direct experience about 'polyurethane glues' {like 'Gorilla Glue'}.However, my experience with polyester resin, and examples from respected colleagues leads me to believe that the epoxy is much the superior product.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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CNT wrote:

I don't recall whether the Elmer's WW glue was a white or yellow glue--I never liked the Elmer's I did use very much so haven't used any for so long I don't recall.
All the yellow carpenters' glues are essentially the same w/ only slight variations. The dark Titebond is ok, but never saw any real need--a good glue line will essentially disappear anyway.
The Type II and III are designed for exterior or wet/damp applications. There's not much difference between Type II and I for cost, but Type III is quite a bit more expensive. No reason to spend the money unless you have a specific need.
I recommend against the polyurethane glues unless, again you have a specific need. The only real needs I see is for truly waterproof applications and for oily woods where they perform better. These glues do need moisture to cure. I've never seen a recommendation to wet a surface for aliphatics--they're water-soluble before dry and don't require moisture to dry/cure.
As for the filling properties of polyurethanes, they expand on drying, but it's by a foaming action..it is not at all a filling material. To expect it to cure a sloppy joint isn't going to happen. The foaming, in fact, plus the very long open time is a prime reason I really don't like using them at all.
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I have never heard of this. I checked out their website and don't see anything there either. Can you reference your "question"?
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http://www.titebond.com/download/pdf/ww/GlueGuideTB.pdf
The second sentence at the very top-left corner...
Chuck

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"Because Titebond Polyurethane Glue needs moisture to cure, lightly dampen the joint with water before gluing"
Specific to PU types, including the Titebond PU.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
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that doesn't apply to the blue cap version. Just the version similar to Gorilla glue.

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As I read that it says "For Titebond Polyurethane Glue.................."

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