Thought regarding DW735 planer

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Wes Stewart wrote:

I'm normally a big fan of refurbs, if the incentive is there, but check this out:
We have a DeWalt "outlet store" in Wethersfield, CT. Coastal Tool is 10-15 minutes away. Coastal sells "perfect" DeWalt tools for less than the outlet sells refurbs. <G>
The only thing I've ever actually purchased at the outlet was a $7 metal chip chute for my DW733 planer. I've been shoved away from a "deal" at the outlet store by a moron who doesn't know where Coastal is.
Barry
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I agree that the refurbish is the better deal. While I absolutely do not agree that they are not used at least 1 time. If a tool is rejected in a factory the pieces are generally dismantled and melted down again. Rebuilding a brand new saw to be sold at a discount is expensive, more expensive than simply building a new one.
By definition, refurbish is To make clean, bright, or fresh again; renovate. Brand new units never leave this condition.
Typically the refurbished units are shipped from the factory to be sold and for what ever reason are returned to the factory for credit. If the unit is still in sellable condition it will be refurbished and resold as refurbished.
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Nothing like that close, more's the pity.

I've owned a lot of refurb tools and have never had a problem with any of them. I consider it a very good option when price is a concern (which it always is). When I bought my air compressor refurbed at HD the guy there told me that they had a lot of those that were picked up by a contractor for a single job then returned for credit when the job was done. HD used to (maybe still does) have a "no questions asked" return policy. That compressor is still going great, but it has taken years to flush all the crud out of the tanks, since the previous user evidently never bothered to drain them.

The chip collection thing is one of the major selling points to me, since I don't have any dust collection in the shop yet. Add the more rigid design in and it starts to look better and better, regardless of the number of blades etc. I do like the slow speed idea just because it might help on highly figured woods, which are a large part of my justification for purchasing - the cost of that wood in a planed form is unbelievable - far better to try to find it in the rough. It would probably only take a couple of projects for the difference in cost to pay for the planer.
Anyway, it's a bit in the future, I raised the "guitar for planer" plan yesterday and received one of those looks that asks you how you like sleeping on the couch. It's odd - I don't actually play the guitar but I own this very nice one...
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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So, here's an off the wall thought -
When I was looking for a planer last year, the Dewalt 735 also was the object of my lust - however, I had been looking at the 15" Bridgewood and Yorkcraft 15" also. I convinced myself that I didn't have enough shop space or real need for a machine that size. I started looking at the DeWalt 735, but being the cheap person that I am, I just couldn't get past that $499 price either.
I happened to stumble into HD one day and found a Ridgid 13" on sale for like $199 - regularly $379, so on impulse, I bought it. I was on of the "old" Ridgid's (manufactured by Emerson??? It was when they were switching over to the Ryobi line - I can't remember). Anyway, it has done everything I've needed it to do. It makes great cuts, and does a great job. I'd done some research, and found that it was a "Top Value" on one of the WOOD Mag survey's a couple of years ago.
NO question the DeWalt is the "Cadillac", and I'd love to have one, but for the difference in price??? You may have a lot more WW experience than I do (probably!), and maybe you're use is heavier than mine, but I'd ask myself if I really need the top of the line - Would the Delta work? I also saw the Ridgid model in HD the other day too, both for less than the DeWalt.
Just my $.02 -
Nick B.

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Tim Douglass wrote:

Just found this, they have the DW735 for $379.00
http://www.masterwholesale.com/details/1107216625 /
I do not see that they are saying this is refurbed. Possibly given the name, they are wholesale only.
David
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They didn't seem to have any problem selling to me. I went up to the point of buying to see what shipping was. $90. Kinda made the low price pointless.
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Dave Hall wrote:

I agree that the shipping is very expensive, but for some people, getting it at $469 after shipping will be a good deal. Even on Amazon with free shipping and $25 off of purchases over $199 it ends up at $475. Hopefully people that are close to them will get a better shipping rate. It is a heavy beast for sure. I UPS'd a 24lb tenon jig to someone on eBay and it cost $25 for that. Shipping is expensive for heavy items.
It would be interesting if you lived close enough to Seattle whether or not you could just pick it up. That would be a deal at $379.
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I picked up the DW734 in December during an Amazon sale. It has worked great on everything I've sent through, quilted maple, curly redwood, oak, walnut and myrtle. The finishes on everything were great, with small passes even the curly redwood came out just about ready to go.
With all the rebates and discounts it came to ~$225 out the door.
-SAM
Tim Douglass wrote:

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