Thought regarding DW735 planer

Page 1 of 3  
I've been looking at planers for some time. Recently my object of lust has been the DW 735 - less for the 2 speed function than for all the other nice stuff about it. As usual I have been looking to see if I can find a great deal that I can persuade my wife to let me buy. In the process I have discovered something - *no one* has it on any kind of discount. It is $499 everywhere I have looked, either retail at a local store or online. I guess it is so much in demand that list price is the selling price. I did find a factory reconditioned one for $399, so I may try to jump that way. All I need to do now is convince her that it is OK for me to sell the guitar she bought me for my last birthday and turn it into a planer. Wish me luck.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If push comes to shove you can always follow her around and play her tunes she not that fond of? I mean alll day? Loud?
<g>
An aquintance of mine showed off his 735... quite a machine indeed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Noticed the same thing about that planer. Nobody is offering any specials. Even used on Ebay, and there are not going for a huge discount over new.
I did however think this was worth sharing.
One person was offering these on Ebay indicating they purchased them on some kind of closeout sale. I placed a bid and a day or so later received an e-mail from someone indicating the seller was scamming people. Within a day the items (this seller listed a few) were removed by Ebay. Guess the message is be careful. It seems some of the Ebay scammers are using this particular item as bait.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I shopped price on one for a long time and I agree w/ your observation. That being said, there were some sales at xmas and I snagged one for quite a bit less at Amazon. Just a few days later the price went back up to $499. Had the price not dropped, having read many reviews here and elsewhere, I may have gotten the 734 DW planer and probably been happy with it. BTW, Toolking has them reconditioned for $305, incl shipping. Toolking also has a refurb 735 at $400, and I think it has full warranty. HTH. -- Igor
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Toolking is the place I found the refurb for $399. They also only list $6.99 for shipping, which seems odd for a 100 lb item, but....
Oregon has no sales tax, but here in the center I'm pretty much limited to the borgs and a bunch of places that tend to run significantly more expensive, so if I can mail order something like that with a reasonable shipping cost it works out well.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I think their shipping is "free" but they charge a small per-order fee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ahhh... that would make sense. Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IMHO the 2 speed thing is a gimmick on these smaller planers and I am beginning to really dislike all the disposable blades. I think would do for the older model with the 2 resharpenable knives.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Leon,
The typical 2 speed, 2 blade planers I would agree, but with the DW735, the number of cuts and speeds are significantly different, not to mention the 3 knives. The results I have seen from other "inexpensive" planers don't come close to the DW735.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I agree it looks nice and does a nice job but after you have some hours on the knives or one gets the inevitable nick all that smoothness goes down the drain as you are going to have to scrape and or sand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

mention
hours
down
Or you could just feed the board in again without changing the thickness setting. What are the chances of the nick hitting the same exact spot on the board?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think it's a lot less than the likelihood that snipe can be avoided again.
Scraping and/or sanding is not that big a deal. And there are always grain reversals to which one must attend.
Production speeds? Drum and/or wide belt sander for the final passes.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pretty likely actually that the paths will cross and at some point the high spot will be missed again as the two paths cross. Still you have missed my point. Planing with a planer is not a finish job. It is intended to take the wood down to a desired thickness. If you are sending the wood through again to try to eliminate high spots caused by a nick, you are wasting time. You have to sand or scrape the board surface anyway why run it through the planer again.
Large stationary planers Need 2 speeds. The fast speed is much faster than a portable planer's fast speed and the surface it leaves is totally unsatisfactory. The slower speeds on the stationary planers is smoother and takes most the scallops out left by the high speed pass. For portable planers the fast speed is slow enough to prepare a surface for scraping or sanding. The slow speed may save you a little scraping or sanding time but after the blades develop nicks the finish out of the planer is going to look pretty much like any other planer. The nice smooth surface out of the 2 speed planers lasts as long as the knives are cutting perfectly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have had a DW734 for a couple of years and have been very happy with it. I wished I had waited for the DW735 until I started hearing others say the 2 speed was of little benefit. Being able to resharpen blades was one consideration when I bought the DW734 also.
Walt Conner

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I dunno who's saying that the two speeds are of little benefit, but I'd guess it's mostly people who don't own DW735s. I've had one for over a year, and I see a *tremendous* benefit.
Of course, I don't go hogging 1/8" off in a single pass, either...
And the blades on the 735 *are* resharpenable, if you have a light touch. After 15 months or so, and many hundreds of board feet, I'm still on the original knives.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The messages may be in the archives. Some comments from people who DO have them have been that one speed is slow and the other slower and after the first few passes, little difference in cut is noticeable.
My first message said I wished I had waited for a DW735 but DW734 has been very satisfactory. DW725 blades are referred to as "disposable" as I guess any blade is but the DW724 blades are intended for resharpening.
Walt Conner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mine are too. As a 735 owner, the slower speed has saved my bacon a coupl'a times. Maybe knowledge or technique wulda/culda done the same. Dunno. Ran some Lacewood thru it the other day down to 1/4". Nary a hint of tearout or snipe.
And for the comment about it not being a finish planer - the finish on my stuff (albeit with pretty new blades) is amazing.
Unless they meant Finnish planer, then I'd have to agree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IMHO it's no gimmick at all. I bought one last summer ($475 at -gag- Lowes). I immediately ran 80 bf of 4/4 cypress through it that I wanted to build a potting bench with. Since then I've run some pretty raw oak and walnut through it, using both speeds... it put an almost glass-like finish on the walnut.
It's pretty much left me drooling when I've used it. Thanks be to an understanding wife and living 2.5 hrs from Steve Wall Lumber. My only complaint is the volume levels... I usually run it on my carport and if my neighbors had bomb shelters they'd all be diving into them when it revs up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So are you saying that you do not ever have to sand the wood after planing? None of your knives has a nick in it yet??? If you are sanding you are probably wasting time with the slower speed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

would do

The second finishing speed is truely amazingly smooth. You CAN sand directly with 220 after planing and be done.
I've not knicked my knives, yet, but if I recall they can be turned, and it is likely can can slide one knife a bit one way or another to smooth out the ridge. There is no rule that says you have to turn all the knives at once.
The blower out blows the sucking of my shop vac.
Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.