Target coatings: how about...

9000 Series Super-Clear Polyurethane One-Part Hybrid Copolymer Part # 9100, 9200, 9500
anyone use this for a tabletop? I'm looking for a sprayable waterborne product that dries fast and hard.
I talked to their rep about poly carbonate coatings, but wince at the price - more than $70 delivered per gallon (with tax).
I guess CV is out of the question as that uses nasty xylene. From what I gathered today, waterborne lacs won't be as hard as some other finishes.
Am I gonna have to resort to a high quality poly? If so, does the one listed at the top dry a LOT faster than Minwhacks?
OR what's the story on durability of acrylics? If they are good, waterborne, what brand?
I'm running out of options for spraying my desk. I thought Sherwin Williams would have something but unless I go with a solvent based product they didn't have anything that sounded fast drying and table-top worthy.
Lord, deliver me from the poly based blues - I didn't get all this equipment to spray that stuff.
Oh, WW gods, show me the way...
dave
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9000 Series Super-Clear Polyurethane One-Part Hybrid Copolymer Part # 9100, 9200, 9500
anyone use this for a tabletop? I'm looking for a sprayable waterborne product that dries fast and hard.
I talked to their rep about poly carbonate coatings, but wince at the price - more than $70 delivered per gallon (with tax).
I guess CV is out of the question as that uses nasty xylene. From what I gathered today, waterborne lacs won't be as hard as some other finishes.
Am I gonna have to resort to a high quality poly? If so, does the one listed at the top dry a LOT faster than Minwhacks?
OR what's the story on durability of acrylics? If they are good, waterborne, what brand?
I'm running out of options for spraying my desk. I thought Sherwin Williams would have something but unless I go with a solvent based product they didn't have anything that sounded fast drying and table-top worthy.
Lord, deliver me from the poly based blues - I didn't get all this equipment to spray that stuff.
Oh, WW gods, show me the way...
dave
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Dave,
What sort of finish are you trying to achive? What is the table top/desk top made from? What does it have to endure? I know a lot about finishing and might be able to make a suggestion.
Thanks,
David.
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Red oak. I'm gonna stain it with Bonakemi DriFast stain, after filling the pores with troweable filler, then use the appropriate sealer that is compatible with the topcoat. it'll be used as a desk in a study.
I've called several distributors today, thinking that something waterborne would work, but I'd PREFER something that "burns in", dries fast, at least as hard as a top quality poly, and doesn't cost in excess of $50/gallon like one product at Target coatings. I thought about PSL, but the rep said it isn't tough enough for table tops; but great for cabinet doors and sides. So what's left: acrylic urethanes? I don't want to use xylene or lacquer thinned products if I can help it, but then again everyone says that lacquer isn't as tough as some other coatings anyway, so lac is out.
If i have to go with poly, I'm sure it'll be hard, but it dries SLOWLY, unless there is a great fast drying one that I don't know about yet. If I go with waterborne poly, is that gonna be tough enough for a top?
Seems like the best choice is the poly carbonate EM9300 but the cost is too much. Over $70/gal delivered. If I was gonna do a bunch of table tops I'd get that, but I'm not planning on that coating too many table tops. More furniture and cabinets than tops, so I figured I'd be using a bit cheaper finishing materials.
My head is spinning with product info: so here is it in a nutshell:
1. Durable for table tops 2. dry quickly (negotiable) 3. prefer 100% burn-in product 4. waterborne preferred IF product meets items 1-3 5. I can spray it since I finally got an HVLP 6. No nasty non-California compliant coating 7. I'm completely in the dark about acrylic coatings. Are they better/worse than oil based poly.
Fall back plan is to use oil based poly but I don't like the look and I don't like slow drying times.
dave
David F. Eisan wrote:

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Dave,
Check out this link,
http://davidswoodshop.homestead.com /
It is an oak table I made for a friend. I used Minwax oil based poly, I put two coats a day on. One morning and then one in the evening, building up quite a thick layer, most of which I sanded off as I back sanding the table flat. Ash is quite similar to red oak in porosity. The couple I gave the table too have cats and dogs and I had to make the finish bullet proof. Two years later the table still looks great. Oil base poly isn't as evil as C'less would have you believe.
Read the text on the web page, let me know what you think and ask any questions you may have.
Thanks,
David.
Every neighbourhood has one, in mine, I'm him.
Remove the "splinter" from my email address to email me.
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Hi BAD. When I was making a couple of dozen oak table tops for a restaurant last summer I asked around and found that a couple of big manufactures had switched to using WB urethane exclusively. Target was one of the brands that was mentioned favourably. As mentioned in an earlier post, I used a Flecto product and was happy with the finished product. And I sprayed four coats a day. Next time I will give Target or Turbinaire's product a go. Oh yeah, and loose your concern for "burn-in" just practice, practice, practice a lot with your new sprayer. For me this is more important than the type of finish you ultimately choose. I would not make you dream project your first spray project. Cheers, JG
Bay Area Dave wrote:

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