Surface/Thickness Planer Comments

Page 1 of 3  
Any suggestions on the best surface/thickness planer to purchase. I had a 12" Jet for years. There are so many options out there now. I've been looking at the new DeWalt DW735 model, but I haven't seen any comparison reviews of this machine. Or, should I step up to a heavier 3hp model ($900-$1100 range) or stay with the bench type? I'm a weekend woodworker who likes quality tools for making 3-4 pieces of furniture per year. Thanks for any suggestions. Tom
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I really like my DeWalt...now they do have the same with three cutter head....without the two speed selector you still have a huge amount of cuts per inch. If it was me, my money would go on this one.
--
Mike

"takeith" < snipped-for-privacy@insightbb.com> a ιcrit dans le message de
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you live near a Rockler store, some of the stores have the Dewalt finish planer (about the equivalent of the Dewalt 735) on sale for $349.
Bob

Thanks
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would look for one with an adjustable stop for various finished thicknesses. Also I would not put much weight into a 2 speed feed model unless getting a bigger stationary one. While the 2 speed in the portables is cool, once a blade gets a nick in it, the slow speed is a moot point. Regardless of which speed you use you still need to go over the surface with a scraper or sandpaper. Because I sharpen my own blades I would prefer one without disposable blades. If you don't sharpen your own blades, the cost of replacing the disposable ones and having the permanent ones resharpened is just about a wash. A cutter head lock should go without saying on the portable models and many models now feature an automatic lock which would be preferable to the manual locking ones.

Thanks
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Uuuuhh, you could of course shift one of the blades to the side, eliminating the effect of the nick.

Here's another take on the issue: I have the DW735 with disposable blades. I see the disposable blades as a plus for two reasons:
1) The blades are self-centering (at least on the DW735), which means I cannot make a mistake installing the blades, nor do I need an adjuster thingie, nor do I need to spend all that time getting it right: making test cuts, measuring, adjusting, testing again, etc... Apparently blade alignment is a big problem, given that there are so many devices out there for aligning blades. I'm just glad I do not have to deal with it.
2) The blades are reversible, so when it is time to reverse them, it is a warning that you might need new blades sometime in the near future. In other words you are not left with your pants down in the middle of a project.
At a cost of $45 for a new set of reversible blades, I do not mind at all. I have had the DW735 for about 5-6 months now, and have not had to even reverse the blades yet. Granted, I am not running the planer 24x7, but my point is that $45 is inconsequential for a weekend warrior, specially if it saves me from all the issues around blade adjustment.
Of course, $45 is an even better deal if you have no sharpening equipment or skills. I certainly fall into this category.

I'm only aware of one that locks automatically (the DW735).
--
gabriel

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Regardless, you should still scrape or finish sand the surface.

I am using a 10" Ryobi that I bought in 1988... Blade change takes me 15 minutes and blade alignment is done outside the planer. Really no adjusting at all. You bolt the blade to its carrier setting on a jig, then bolt the blade to the planer. I think you may be seeing alignment devices for jointers or stationary planers. I have never seen anything for portable planers myself.

Unless they have already been reversed... ;~) For me that has never been a problem anyway at least in the last 16 years.

I would hope not...
Granted, I am not running the planer 24x7,

I think the alignment issues on portable planers may be blown up a bit...

The last I paid to have my blades sharpened I paid 45 cents an inch...

Makita came out with one with this feature about 2 or 3 years ago. IIRC the new Delta does also.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, so you like your situation, I like mine. Now the OP has more info, I hope.
--
gabriel

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

surface with

I use the slow speed exclusively on my DW735, and it is completely shiny smooth. A light sanding with #220 is only needed if you want to rough it up a little . . . I've yet to try the faster speed as the slow works so well, and is plenty fast enough for me.
Cheers,
Scott
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, I like my Ridgid 13". Like Gabriel, I like the 2 sided blade feature. When I have to switch to the second side, I've still got plenty of time to get a set of replacement blades. FWIW, the head lock on mine is manual, right underneath the height adjustment wheel. I've had mine for about 5 years now, and I now have my 3rd set of blades in it. I did have to replace my infeed roller after I let SIL use it. Just my opinion.
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jerry Gilreath wrote:

SIL? Someone In Lingerie? Some Idiot Lurking? Some In-Law?
What does "SIL" mean?
--
gabriel

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In this case some imbecile looming! That would be my Son In Law. Not by choice either!!
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
oups!!!
I hope your daugther is happy with him in that case...otherwise it is very sad....
--
Mike
"Jerry Gilreath" < snipped-for-privacy@inNOSPAMsightbb.com> a ιcrit dans le message de
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yea, regrettably she is. The boy's got a helluva lot to learn. He's a design engineer for G.E. and about as common sense smart as a box of hair. That's one reason there ain't no G.E. appliances in this house!
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are happy with that... but scraping and or sanding will help to smooth out the small scallops left by the blade. Granted they are very difficult to see but they are there and with some stains you may see them more easily.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you could run the planner wood feed rate SLOW ENOUGH the scalloped areas are essentially gone. You ONLY get scallops if the wood moves forward a greater distance than the next blade hitting cannot straighten out.
With most planners, you have 1 or 2 speeds, and you take what you get.
Some of the more expensive planners have a infinitiely variable wood feedrate, and for that last past you can crank it down where the wood crawls thru the planner, and the scalloping is virutally non-existant
John On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 22:34:03 GMT, "Leon"

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, not really. The blade just isn't properly severing/ejecting the chip. Thus the variable speed so that woods of several characteristics may be more properly accommodated with a fixed sharpness angle. One size damn near fits all, of course, but hand-planing or scraping is still preferred.
Slow feed rates and less-than-perfect knives can make for some tough case-hardening. And a burnished surface looks great right up until the point that you put some oil on it, revealing the differential absorption between the burnished bottoms and torn edges.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have not personally used the 3HP models, but when I asked the same questions, the impressions that I was left with was that the 15" stationary units did not offer better quality of cut (perhaps less so), but they did offer quicker stock removal, and of course, the extra couple of inches in width.
As a weekend warrier myself, I could not justify double the cost for some time savings and a minimal increase in width capacity.
I'm sure this big boys last longer, but is that significant for a hobbyist?
Just my 2 cents.
-Steve

Thanks
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The new DeWalt is the way to go if you want the best of cuts. It's 3 blade configuration means that it's slowest speed provides just under twice the cuts per inch than the two speed Delta's highest speed and CPI is the name of the game.
As for whether you should get another bench top or a 3 HP, I'll pass you wouldn't like my answer.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I run a portable Hitachi but would like a second, heavier, planer to do the bulk of my work. That way I could keep my Hitachi tuned up real sweet for the light finish work that it is really designed for. My guess is that it would stay sharp longer last longer overall.
So this puts me in a good position to wait for a good deal on a quality used piece of equipment at auction or similar.
Just some thoughts,
David

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Popular Woodworking just did a comparison of seven portable planers. The Dewalt 735 was their editor's choice while the Delta was their best value. As I'm also in the market for a thickness planer I've appreciated this thread.
Kevin Daly
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.