Stupid Electrical question

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I ordered the new 18"Rikon and I need to get wired for 240V. I am considering doing it myself, but I don't know if I should use a 20A or 30A breaker? Th4e motor only pulls 12.5A, but at start up it might pull more correct? Should I go 30A just to be safe?
Here is the saw.
http://www.rikontools.com/Products/Bandsaws/10-345.html
I think I might call Rikon tomorrow unless..
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Stoutman
http://www.garagewoodworks.com
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Personally, I would go with the 20amp, Which is what I had my electrical contractor do for my table saw . The TS only draws 14 amps, and YES start up does increase the amps, I feel that 20 is more then sufficient, that saw should be the only thing on that breaker anyway, RIGHT? You really want that breaker to trip in an emergency, I would want my emergency threshold to be as low as possible without taking away from my power needs.
Searcher
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You could use a 15a breaker if you want to. It will would not trip under normal circumstances. The more important thing is the cable gauge. Unless you are a very long way from the breaker box, #12 is adequate. You could get away with #14, but that would be a mistake in the long run. If, for some bizarre reason, you go with a 30a breaker, you must use #10 wire. If you are concerned about voltage drop, the best combination would be #10 on a 20a breaker.
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I just got back from Home Depot. I got a 20A breaker and 10 gauge wire. If I ever need to change to 30A all I have to do is swap breakers and I don't need to rewire.
Thanks!
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Someone wrote:
>I ordered the new 18"Rikon and I need to get wired for 240V. I am >considering doing it myself, but I don't know if I should use a 20A or 30A >breaker? Th4e motor only pulls 12.5A, but at start up it might pull more >correct? Should I go 30A just to be safe?
Use #10 AWG, 2 conductor with ground and a 2P-30A C'bkr.
The C'bkr protects the insulation on the wire, not the saw motor.
To protect the motor, you need a thermal motor overload relay, which may already be in the motor.
Lew
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That's just silly -- there's no need to use a 30A circuit to run a twelve-amp tool. A 20A circuit on 12ga wire will do fine.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Now why would you use #10 and a 2p CB . You want to save the wire but the hell with the mtr if there is a problem. I would put the 20 amp and get the damn thing to trip earlier if there is a problem . In this case 20 amp breaker will protect the wire better by acting sooner to trip.
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O D wrote:
> Now why would you use #10 and a 2p CB .
Standard configuration to meet code.
> You want to save the wire but > the hell with the mtr if there is a problem.
Don't give a damn about the wire, only the insulation on the wire.
> I would put the 20 amp and > get the damn thing to trip earlier if there is a problem . In this case > 20 amp breaker will protect the wire better by acting sooner to trip.
Better go back and get a better understanding of the operation of a thermal-magnetic c'bkr.
The 20A rating is simply a thermal mechanism, not a fault current protective function.
If you want to protect the motor, the c'bkr doesn't do it.
You need a motor overload relay.
Lew
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Lew my mistake I did not mention that someone wanted to use a 30 amp braker, My whole point was that the 20 will trip befor the 30 and if all you have on the like is a 12.5A motor and that puppy goes locked rotor then the 20 trips faster that what the 30 would have. I am not sure what the code says or an inspector would say but if they knew you were going to run only a 12.5A on the 30 amp breaker would it pass inspection? And of course wire size what ever he chose 10 or 12 as someone suggested. Guess this all comes down to why they have inspectors and why there is a code. And why we have licenced electricans. Which is where this question should have been directed.
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O D wrote:
> Lew my mistake I did not mention that someone wanted to use a 30 amp > braker, > My whole point was that the 20 will trip befor the 30 and if all you > have on the like is a 12.5A motor and that puppy goes locked rotor then > the 20 trips faster that what the 30 would have.
I am probably suggested using a 2P-30A to protect the #10 AWG conductor insulation.
The norm for selecting motor circuit protection is to select a device (fuse or c'bkr) that is about 2.5-3.0 time the nameplate FLA.
30/12.5 = 2.4 which is within spec.
> I am not sure what the code says or an inspector would say but if they > knew you were going to run only a 12.5A on the 30 amp breaker would it > pass inspection?
Absolutely. See above.
> And of course wire size what ever he chose 10 or 12 as someone > suggested.
Part of the reason I suggested using #10 AWG wiring is that it provides just about the lowest cost solution available.
Buy a 25 ft long, 2 conductor with ground molded cord set, then cut of the molded ends and wire up your saw on one end and a suitable 240 VAC male plug on the opposite end.
I'd use a locking device, but that is just personal preference.
Lew
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What does Rikon say?
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It is amperage is ONLY mentioned in the users manual when referring to the motor (12.5A).
I'm gonna wire for 20A unless someone knows why I should do otherwise.

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You'll be fine ... and although the 10 ga wire is not strictly necessary for your current needs, it won't hurt a thing and you will ready for most future increases/upgrades without having to rewire.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
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The plug supplied with your new bandsaw is a 240 Volt, 20 Amp, NEMA 6-20R. A 20 amp circuit should be more than enough. Thats what I use for my 2hp delta rc-33 and I've never had a problem. The motor has never bogged down under a full load either. Good luck and enjoy the new saw!
Aloha... Craig

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Thank you!
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I would suggest a 20 Amp breaker and #8 wire. If the 20 Amp should trip at startup you could always change to 30 amp, but I seriously doubt that it will trip.
This should give you a very safe operation, especially if you use an adequately rated plug and socket.
Don Dando

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but
Holy Cow - #8 wire? Wire not just pull freekin' triplex through the wall? As has been stated several times in the original thread, 12 ga is plenty sufficient.
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-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Lots of answers. Match to your plug rating to reduce confusion. Match your breaker to the AWG to meet code. Less confusion for you or anyone encountering what you've done. All will be as expected.
Draw on startup? Doubt yours draws the rated amps, given the minimum starting load on a bandsaw. Might get there if you're feeding fast on a honkin' resaw, though.
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I had an interesting problem with 115v.. maybe it will help you with your amp decision.. ANd one stupid thing I did was to NOT ask here first as you're doing.. *g*
Rewired the garage using the old 220v lines with a leg grounded and made one 3 wire, 110v circuit, which I spread all over the shop with 12 gauge romex... The original 220 had 2 40 amp breakers so I ended up with a 40 amp breaker on my shop circuit...
I found out the hard way that you need to have a circuit breaker that will trip BEFORE your wiring overheats... No serious fire, luckily, but a lot of plugs and outlets to be changed after I swapped the 40 amp breaker for a 20.. YMWV
(admitting my stupid mistake in the hope of helping you) Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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The only problem I see with a 10AWG wire on a 20 amp breaker is in the instanse where the panel needs replacing after a misshap to the panel.
For example, a friend of mine's panel melted down (Due to poor electrical connections -- A story in itself) The insurance covered the mishap and send an electrician to replace the panel. The electrician hooked up the wires to breakers according to their sizes.
To make a long story short, A outside outlet was connected to a 12/2 hot water tank wire, where the the Neutral was the red wire and the black was the hot. When the electrician plugged in his tools, they worked really good for about 2 secs.
If the motor pulls 12.5 amps, a 15amp breaker would be more than enough. My metal chop saw is recommended to run on 20 amps, but my limitations are 15 amps, and it still works fine, just can't push hard on it.
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