Stuff at tomorrow's auction

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Considering the web site above, it is most assuredly a Type 10 (1907-1909), w/original iron. If it makes you feel any better, I'm pretty sure the rear handle has been replaced and I don't have the original box it came in. ;)
I got more interested in planes after I read "The Hand Plane Book" by Garrett Hack. It was a very nice read 3 years ago and I'm sure I would learn plenty from another time through. It has excellent pictures too, in case anyone is searching for a good book.
Bill
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You really suck!! I felt the suckage all the way to the Yukon!
Luigi
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Bill wrote:

A Type 10 - very nice! Corrugated or smooth sole? Stanley never made them finer than during this era. I have a couple of Type 10s myself; most of the rest are Type 11s.

Nah; it sounds fine just the way it is. If it was "all original in the box" you'd have to put it on the shelf and look at it instead of using it! Congratulations on the nice find, and enjoy your plane (and the next one, and the next one...)
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 21:55:49 -0500, Steve Turner wrote:

Boy, does he suck!
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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There is probably grain running somewhat side to side vs. running completely end to end. If you were to cut a new slat that was parallel to the wood grain, it would be much stronger. And of course, if you used a stronger wood, that would help, too.
[...snip...]

And then...

Elmer's yellow woodworking glue vs. Titebond? Pretty comparable, really. Elmer's should be "stronger than the wood", same as Titebond. See below for some supporting data.

I am guessing Lew suggested epoxy because it is strong even when you have gaps, good when repairing cracked wood such as you have.
For some general info on strength of glues, here's a link to a test done by Fine Woodworking (the link works only if you pay for their web extras). http://www.finewoodworking.com/fwnpdf/011192036.pdf
They tested, from best to worst,
Titebond III SystemThree T80 Epoxy Elmer's Carpenter's Glue Liquid "Old Brown" Hide Glue. Moser's Hide Glue Gorilla Glue
on Maple, Oak, and Ipe. For each wood, they tested on tight, snug, and loose joints.
The Titebond III and epoxy were neck and neck througout the test, with Elmer's a close third.
In general, all the glues were within shouting distance, although Gorilla Glue had poor results on loose joints and was overall the weakest.
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So what, if anything *is* it good for? Mostly, although never having used it, I believed it was a effective, strong, glue. I guess I fell for the name and the advertising crapola.
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Upscale wrote:

Admittedly, the hype surrounding Gorilla Glue piqued my interest as well, but I was always apprehensive about it and only used it a couple of times in situations where I was "ok" with the possibility of it behaving unexpectedly. However, since reading the aforementioned article in Fine Woodworking I haven't touched the stuff.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
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A salesman at Lowes pushed me to it. I haven't opened it yet.
I bought some to glue washers (one on each side) to a painted hollow wooden closet door to (hopefully) resolve the damage caused over time by a long bolt which goes through the door to hold a knob on. The hole for the bolt has wore into an oval through normal use making it "sloppy". For better or worse, I designed that solution myself.
From this thread, it seems like the epoxy may be a better choice than the Gorilla Glue. Would I be well advised to remove any paint (I was just planning to clean well)?
I'll be cutting the "washers" myself, so that I get a perfect fit, but that's another story.
By the way, thank you for all of the kind and thoughtful comments about my new plane!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

First, do remove the paint--glue and paint do not work and play well together.
Second--regardless of its adhesive qualities, Gorilla Glue foams a bit--try it on a sample and see what you're dealing with--I think you'll find that for the purpose you're describing it's going to be a pain in the butt just because you're going to have to deal with the foam-out.

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J. Clarke wrote:

I'm glad you mentioned that because one of the reasons I am making my own "washers" is because I need them to be very thin (and I think I can make washers just like I need in 1% of the time it would take me to buy them). From what you've said, Gorilla Glue is clearly the wrong choice, and, once again, I was led astray by an overzealous salesperson.
Thanks, Bill
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