Stuff at tomorrow's auction

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I went and previewed the tools:
They Have a (Stanley) Bailey #8 plane (24") in excellent conditon. I've own it's 9" and 14" cousins, I wonder whether I need this one? I know it's called a "jointer", but would I find it useful more generally for smoothing?
Dewalt 705 Compound Miter Saw (if it has dust collector, it wasn't attached). Will take another look tomorrow. I suspect it would be handy sometime. I would bid on it if the price is really right. What would you pay?
Any thoughts?
It's not all about "need", "want" counts too right? :)
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By the way, the miter saw is 12".
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

You can by a new DeWalt 10" for $199.
705 is not a current model.
$75, MAYBE?
Lew
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Thanks. I appreciate it. Bill
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I'm sure my wife thanks you too! ;)
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joints that will rub together and make up without clamps. :-)
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That's "touching"... ;)
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Bill wrote:

What kind of question is that? Of *course* you need it! :-)

I wouldn't use it for that; too heavy. Your smoother is generally going to be your most finely tuned plane, with a tight mouth and razor-sharp cutter, adjusted to cut shavings thinner than a piece of paper. Not that your jointer shouldn't be razor-sharp as well, but if you tune it the same was as a smoother then it's going to take you all day to flatten a board. Its sheer heft combined with inertia allows you to open the mouth a bit and take bigger cuts.
Those videos that Leon posted the other day offer some wonderful education on how the various types of planes can be used to great advantage. Here they are again:
Glide Leg Vise http://www.benchcrafted.com/videos/benchcraftedglide.wmv
Roubo Bench and a little handy plane work. ;~) http://www.benchcrafted.com/videos/roubo.wmv
Wagon Vise http://www.benchcrafted.com/videos/benchcraftedtailvise.wmv
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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Everything Steve said. And ignore Lew on flattening your bench. I used my handplanes & it was great exercise & a lot of fun.
Luigi
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On Tue, 01 Sep 2009 23:37:09 -0400, Bill wrote:

I've got a 19th century #8 and love it. Just the other day, I assembled a blanket chest and one of the top rails was about 1/64" proud of the leg on one end. A few strokes with my #8 took care of that and still left the rail top flat.
I've used a #7, but the added inertia of the #8 slices through the tough spots (like knots) with less hesitation.
At the time I bought mine, I got it for $80 including shipping only because a previous owner had drilled one side for a fence and the collectors didn't want it. If the one you're looking at is pre-war and truly excellent, I'd say anything under $100 is a bargain. If it's post- war, leave it for someone else.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Another plane fan (probably someone I've bid against and spoken with before) had already submitted an offer of $20 but he wasn't present, so I got the plane for $25. I was delighted to hear the silence as the auctioneer did his thing. It's a Bailey #8, and feels great in my hand--not sure whether it is pre war or not (do you know a quick way to tell?)--I'll do my homework on that.
For anyone who doesn't think I have enough clamps yet (and I don't), I also bought an 8" C-clamp and two 6" C-clamps for for $9 altogether. I thought they might come in handly for the jig Lew suggested which makes the jointer unnecessary, among other things..
Now I need some small clamps to make minor drawer-related repairs to a dresser I bought which my wife and I Really Need (one dresser got broken in our recent move and I let another die of natural causes during the same move). I should have taken Lew's advice and bought a few small clamps already. Is there an advantage to Tite-bond glue over Elmers Glue for repairing a drawer support which has cracked? I ask merely because I have Elmer's handy. There is ALOT of surface area to glue to make the repair (so I think it's an easy repair). Is there a recommend way to retouch minor scratches (I'll do my homework on that too)?
I'm sure the "saga" of the Wednesday auction will continue. Thank you for your suggestions and for listening!
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:
Wednesday Auction?
Where I come from that meant livestock.

I like epoxy and/or epoxy fairing putty for that type of repair.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

No, they're either Tues or Thursday... :)
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"dpb" wrote:

Tell me the women sold chicken dinners and also has a bake sale to raise funds while the auction was being held.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Routinely that ceased about 20 years ago, sadly... :(
The lunch counter still operates as a home-cooking "blue-plate special" kinda' place but mere shadow of days of yore...the prevalence of direct-sales to the packers from feeders cuts down the sale to mostly feeders and smaller lots; almost no finished go thru the ring any more.
--
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Just to confirm, I am referring to the "popular", but not see in FWW, drawer mechanism of a single shaped "slat" being hugged by a plastic piece on the bottom of the drawer. One of the slats is cleanly split in two--probably from someone turning the drawer while it was open. Evidently, the slat is subject to stress (torsion?).
From what I can tell, the advantage of the epoxy glues is their flexability. Is that why you suggest the epoxy here. Would my "Gorilla Glue" be just the opposite (non-flexible), and comparably a poor choice? Some people speak of Gorilla Glue like it's almost "heaven sent"... :)
Lew, I've seen some of your "yacht project" online; if you don't mind my asking, what sort of projects are you doing now? Is the yacht still in the picture?
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

It also, especially when filled with micro-balloons(fairing putty), has gap filling ability.
It is very forgiving stuff.

IMHO, Gorilla Glue is the most over priced and under peckered crap available.
It fills a gap, but it adds no strength.
Stuff is about as useful as breasts on a boar hog.
I use either epoxy or TiteBondII except for resorcinol when working with white oak which is standard for wooden boat construction.

Moved on from boat.
In between projects.
Lew
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wrote

I glued the drawer support today with epoxy and three 3" C-clamps, glued alternately, along the 5" crack. I was sort of proud of the way it looked there on the driveway resting on two C-clamps, but no one came by to notice. Without the knowledge I have learned from this forum I would not have done it nearly as well. The labor was in removing the piece (held by screws with a square rather than hex shaped opening).
Due to a little wood which has been lost, remaking the piece someday is a possibility. I'll just need a table saw and a router table and I'll need to enrich my vocabulary to talk about the wood I'll need to remove on each side of the support/slat (shaped like a "V resting on it's side"). Nothing like hand-crafting repairs to manufactured furniture, eh? On the positive side this provides motivation to get a router. I was thinking of the Grizzly 1023SLW TS which has a router table on it's extension table. Of course, seeing Mike get a "Gloat!-deal" today on his Delta TS makes me want to search for a great deal too! Never know what will show up at the "Wednesday Auction", but I haven't run across a nice TS yet--plenty of Very Old Craftsman TSs that I doubt merit the investment in a new blade. The auction basically sells "estate stuff".
I'm continuing to work towards grinding the garage floor. I spread several bags of grass seed and fertilizer and 6 40# bags of topsoil on the lawn in the last two days after hand-pulling about six 35 gallon garbage bags full of crab grass. It looked "green enough" but the crab grass bothered me. It doesn't appear to bother my neighbors on either side as much. Getting to that "empty garage floor" stage seemed like an ominous task, but I try to do "something" everyday which gets me closer. I started using a spreadsheet to manage my projects (sequence of procedures, necessary tools, and my $-outlay) and that has greatly improved my outlook. I recommend an approach like this to anyone trying to balance everything in their head (if you don't like technology, then use lots of paper). There is something satisfying about checking things off to see the progress.
Happy Labor Day! Bill
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That means you've still got your clamps. In some neighborhoods, if you turn you back for a second they'll steal your clamps and leave your project sitting on cinder blocks! lol

I'll tell you a little secret... When you do get that garage floor empty, don't let it stay empty. Fill it up with stuff that's easy to move. That way, it looks full so no one fills up your empty space!
I've been doing that since I cleaned out the garage this spring. It looks much better than the "random warehouse" look. Since I don't have to wait for daylight and nice days, I've been using my table saw much more than I ever did before!

Puckdropper
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Bill wrote:

I'm curious to hear just what type of #8 you snagged for $25 (you suck, by the way). You should be able to tell in reasonably short order with the help of this website:
http://hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/index.php
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