Storage of hardware - ideas needed please. (possible duplicate)

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I was in the same situation as you and I confess have lost and found things pretty much the same as you.
I use the 4 compartment stacking inserts for 5 gallon buckets. Inexpensive and works great. I'm able to take my hardware supplies upstairs or outdoors, the buckets themselves stack and everything stays clean and dry.
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"p_j" wrote in message ...

I've seen those, and use one for my garden sprinkler bits and pieces. Ideally though, in the shop I prefer to be able to 'browse' without having to unstack things.
thanks,
--
Greg



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brought forth from the murky depths:

It gets to us all eventually (and often.)

Some plastic boxes, some jugs of mixed hdw (Aieee!), some organized plastic bin boxes. Search Ebay for "storage bins" for the best of all worlds, plastic bin boxes. Add dust covers to the front and Bob's yer uncle.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumberB263 I have 2 of these, combined, with the extra bin storing some of the new hardware I have. I also bought some garage sale jars of mixed hardware which is a bad idea.
I want to move to these and add dust protection. While clear bins are nice, open bins are easier if you can keep the dust out of them. Tilting drawers are a nice combination.
http://www.quantumstorage.com/complete.htm www.grainger.com Akro Mils tilt 'n lock storage bins
or check for same on your little island there. ;)
Alternatively, make a scalloped front on a wooden bin storage system to allow finger/hand space to pick out hardware. 45° wedges create the front (as parts retainers) and allow you to slide pieces out more easily. A cloth/plastic sheet/acrylic front keeps dust out.
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message ...

I had a few of these too, I found the trays brittle and "sticky" when I tried to remove them. Dust got in also so I think I'll move on from them, tenjewberrymoochalldesame.

Hmm, spendy, $20 for two big drawers? There ain't a crowbar strong enough. I have a few 'ZAG' style tilt'n'locks that are nice, so long as you don't add a size, then everything needs to be reshuffled. I also find that dust ingress is still a problem and I am forever blowing them out with compressed air (well, ok, it's fun too!).

Thanks for the ideas Larry,
Greg
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Didja ever wax 'em? Works like a charm. I used paraffin early on and now use Johnson's whenever they feel sticky.

They really need to be inside a cabinet. I'm thinking that a large pass-through shelf right under the middle of my assembly table might be the ideal place for hardware. It would somewhat sheltered from dust under that top, and it would be there at the assy table when I needed some. Accuride makes the 2002 pass-through glides with a center detent for up to 24" either way so I could get hardware from either side. A short skirt of cloth could help keep dust out when it was closed, too.

¿Si, como no? (Jewelcome in Spanish.)
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Here's a summary of what has been proposed plus some other items I stumbled across. I have included a list of likes/dislikes for my storage needs.
Likes: - metal pull handles (easy to use with "gluey" fingers) - transparent containers - removable containers that remain sealed - clear labels - easy to insert a mid-size in system - non breakable - easy access - easily transportable - large enough to get three fingers in to grab item.
Dislikes: - allows dust entry - "tricky" lids or latches - heavy
Storage ideas.
Library card drawers: http://www.chbecksvoort.com/shop.html
Tom Plamann built one in a wall (caution - allow 20min to browse). http://plamann.com/sys-tmpl/intheshopiii/view.nhtml?profile=intheshopiii&UID 006
Canadian Tire metal storage cabinet http://www.canadiantire.ca search on "Mastercraft 43-Drawer Metal Cabinet "
Mark's shop storage - note particularly the bench drawers and yellow bin storage: http://www.mklange.cnc.net
Sliding wall of tools: <http://www.rd.com/americanwoodworker/article.do?siteId "22&categoryIdp02 &contentId@5>
Sliding storage shelf: http://www.woodzone.com/tips/shelf-jig.htm
Power tool storage shelf - http://www.woodworkingtips.com/woodtips/sntip38.html (please, don't ask for plans)
Dowel Storage Rack: http://www.woodworkingtips.com/woodtips/sntip45.html
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I use a carryall style of unit that holds about twenty, one pound coffee cans. this is an old carpenter's solution to carrying and storing nails.
If I get sufficiently motivated, I'll post a pix on ABPW.
(time passes)
OK, I know that I cannot describe in words the beauty of these things - thus, I have put up a pix on ABPW.
Enjoy.
wrote:

Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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wrote:

Honestly, it depends on your space and what you're trying to store. I've got a combination of plastic bins and drawers for all of my screw/bolt/nail/etc hardware and it works just fine. Each bin or drawer is clearly labeled with what's in it. You should go get yourself an inexpensive labeler (you can get a hand-help Dymo for under $20) and make it easy on yourself.
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queried:

Most of my hardware is stored in an old IKEA bookcase we happened to have around. Seven shelves ( I had to add a few) plus the top.
Wood screws are usually bought in boxes of 100 and are kept in them. One shelf for flat head screws, another for pan head.
Nails, drywall screws and nuts & bolts (3/16" and up) are kept in coffee cans, which require periodic blowing out. Nuts and different types of bolts of the same size and thread (and the washers) are kept together in the same coffee can. Lag bolts of different diameters each have their own coffee can. They are at the top of the cabinet. Each size/type of nail and drywall screw also has its own coffee can. One shelf for drywall screws & nails & other misc. stuff, one for common nails and one for finishing nails. One can also for dowelling stuff.
Small nuts and bolts go in a smaller version of the Crappy tire drawer parts cabinet someone else posted. Again sorted by size and thread for the more common ones (#6, #8, & #10). Stainless & brass bolts kept separate, as are the metric threaded ones. I also have 5 covered plastic bins for different types of hardware: e.g. one for hooks, another for eyes, one for wall anchors, etc.

Labelling by hand using some old tractor feed labels I happen to have.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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snip! Is there some software that is good for doing labels? What other considerations

"Avery" mail labels often come with software on a CD or you can download it from their site. Makes the text fit perfectly and does a nice job. Just me $.02 worth
Ed
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I use those when I have a bunch of similar labels to do, like for canning. I also use them for address labels. Actually, I think I might have used them when first setting up the system. But now, when I add a coffee can, it's easier to just write out the label by hand.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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A few months ago I discovered Ziplock food-storage boxes. They come in various sizes, but the ones I use are sized to hold a sandwich. This works out to be just about the right size to hold a pound of nails or screws.
These things are readily available at the grocery store, cheap (about $2 for a pack of five IIRC) light weight, stackable, with covers that seal tight. You can mark them with a magic marker. I have a bunch of them and I just stack them on the shelves in a cabinet in the shop. I have a bunch of extras lying around so I can just grab another any time I need a new "category" of things to store.
wrote:

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If you were to use the tougher zippered bags, you may be able to saw slits into thin wood (maybe diagonally from the front edge) so the bags can hang, all visible-like. I'll have to try that for myself
--
Best regards
Han
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 01:13:15 GMT, John Carlson

A while back, there was a either a tip or short article on how to make a shelving unit to hold those containers. The shelf had slots that mated with the top lips of the containers, using teh containers as drawers.
Barry
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If you go to your local craft shop (Jo Anns locally) you can find ziplock bags down to about 1" x 1". They, and some a bit larger, are nice for set screws, and other tiny parts.
On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 01:13:15 GMT, John Carlson

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Interesting. I'll have to take a look. For vary small stuff I use 35mm film cans, but the problem is that it's not hard (at least for mr) to lose the whole can. I can see where a handful of very small ziplock bags packed into one of those ziplock boxes might work better.
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