"stop the bus" on/off remote control for DC

Maybe it's been posted here and I've missed it, but rather than use some electronic remote control to turn the DC on and off from around the shop, what about a system such as is used on buses to let the driver know that you want to get off -- the "pull cord to signal driver" solution:
Install an outlet and a pull switch (both appropriately sized for the amps) in an elec box and mount that near/to the ceiling. Take a screw-in eye and install that near the box so that a string from the pull switch through the eye will pull the switch the way it is designed to be. Run a string from the switch and through that eye, and then branch off with string run through additional eyes around the shop so that a simple pull anywhere along the runs of string will turn the DC on/off. Now, my shop is only about 18x13 and I can reach the bottom of the joists above me (about 8'), so it is easy to run the strings high enough so that I am unlikely to catch them as I move stuff around the shop. Even for those with higher ceilings/shorter legs, the system could be adapted by running some eyes and strings down the walls near each power tool to which the DC is connected. FWIW, an inexpensive (non-elec) remote control for your DC. -- Igor.
PS: Before I hit send, I DAGS and see that this in mentioned in the FAQ back in 2000. I did not expect that my idea was original, but with the regular questions here about DC remotes, what the hey in bringing it up again. And, kudos to the originals.
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igor wrote:

A string?
It was pretty simple to a a relay to my saw starter to start/stop a relay which feeds 110V to the vacuum. (essentially a controlled outlet)
Rob
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Actually a good idea. I thought of using that idea a few years back, but ended up getting the Long Ranger with 3 transmitters. I have been real happy with it. Just don't start and stop the collector while it is on its starting winding a lot. It is hard on relays.
Back on your idea. I think it would be a great approach. I recommend getting a good 20 or 30 amp switch. It might be even better to get a microswitch and have it control an alternate action relay. Operate the switch or microswitch with a small stainless cable (like the old U control cables for model airplanes--if you are old enough to know what I mean). Threading the cable through small pullies would make it operate smoothly with no annoying "springiness". Using those 3 enhancements would make for a very smooth operating control.
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