stanley coil framing nailer problem

My stanley coil framing nailer will not completely sink 3.25" nails into 2X4's. It leaves about 1/4" out. No leaks,, 3/8" hose, I tried turning up regulator to 125 and no better. It will sink 2.25" nails no problem. Is this normal?
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wrote:

...hell no! Make dam sure you're getting the pressure you dial-in at the end of the hose...if you are, get a new gun...if you aren't, delve out why and fix it...
cg
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That is great advise. I am getting the pressure I need so I should go buy a new $300.00 nailer. While I am at it, my truck has a flat tire, I am going to go buy a new truck as well.
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wrote:

...what I meant was get the gun replaced on warranty...I'm sure it's an anomaly. Sorry for the bad advice. It should drive 16's no problem.
cg
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mark wrote:

It's got an adjusting screw to control depth is one thing...
Also, you got the proper tip on it? Mine came w/ the plate-centering guide installed; it works to find the holes in framing hangers, but won't let head go flush on plain material.
It's likely not the pressure (nor the hose unless you've got a whole bunch--I ran 200' of 3/8" w/ mine on the barn and had no trouble into 100-yr old close-grained yellow pine at 100-lb at the compressor outlet).
--
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"mark" wrote:

---------------------- My money is on the 3/8" hose, too much of it.
Sounds like you sent a boy to do a man's job
You are probably not getting sufficient pressurized air delivered to the gun instanteously when you pull the trigger.
I'd use at least a 5/8" hose from the regulator/tank to the gun limiting the 3/8" hose for the last 5 ft to the gun for convenience.
Having a 5/8" hose connected directly to the gun would be a total PITA.
It's a dynamic not a static situation.
Lew
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Add On Comment:
You can connect 5/8" hose to a 1/2" regulator without any serious pressure drop problems.
Lew -------------------------------------

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t> wrote in message

My hose is connected directly to the top of the tank via a welded on bung so I am getting full 125 with no restrictions through regulator or extra fittings. I do have my gun adjusted to accept 3.25 nails. The tip of my gun has little teeth on it, it is about 3/4" round, not removable. This happens on the first shot and all shots after. Bump firing and single shots. Actually single shots are almost impossible, it almost always double fires and the second nail is out about 2". Like I said it works fine with smaller nails so it is not producing the power required to drive the longer nails. If I take it apart is it basicaly any seals that deal with the large piston.
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net> wrote in message

I took it apart and all seals, cylinder wall etc... look good, any chance the hammer itself has worn, it threads into the piston, I wonder if I could unthread it a bit to lengthen it?
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"mark" wrote:

---------------------------------
Just for grins, try the following:
Set regulator to 100 PSI.
Connect gun with a MAXIMUM of 50 ft of 3/8" hose.
Try to shoot the 3.25 nails on a test piece and see what happens.
If you are satisfied, you are experiencing too much pressure drop in your existing hose set up.
Lew
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For rapid repetitive firing it is dynamic and hose size is a factor. However for single shot firing the hose size is irrelevant as the air used for a single shot is stored in the reservoir in the gun. This usually is a hollow handle and sometimes also a space surrounding the cylinder. Nobody has suggested user technique yet. Is it possible the gun is being pushed away from the wood when fired and not seating the longer nail? You can test this by holding the tip hard against the wood and firing. Art
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Won't the hose diameter just limit the CFM, not the PSI?
scott
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On Mar 10, 4:10pm, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Yes, that is a corrollary of the Bernoulli Law. Pressure will equalize regardless of volume, so the hose size won't be a factor in a perfect world. If you have a tightly sealed configuration, the pressure will be the same at the compressor as it is at the gun.
However...
In this case the compressor has to maintain a specific pressure in the hose. If it is a small compressor and a small hose, then it is significantly more difficult than with a large compressor and a large hose. The larger hose provides more volume under pressure, so the gun doesn't drain the line/tank as fast.
With today's nail guns this usually isn't a problem since they don't use that much air. But if you have a small compressor (low CFMs) and an older gun (high CFM requirement) they are working against you. When I was a framer (about 1,000 years ago) we used to attach every large hose we had to the compressor with tees and manifolds so we could keep the pressure up while all of us were using the guns. It's all about that reservoir of air that is available, whether in the tank, or in the air line that is needed for the gun to fully pressurize.
These days I have a hot dog compressor that will run my framing gun. It kicks on about every third shot and I need to give it time to recover, but it will do it. I used to worry about using the right size hose to make sure the gun was getting enough air to recharge as possible until I realized ALL the fittings on my guns, regardless of hose size were 1/4" outlet.
Still, I use the bigger hoses when doing anything but trim as the guns seem a LOT happier, regardless of Bernoulli.
Robert
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wrote:

I called Stanley today and asked what I thought was a secretary to speak to tech. support. She told me she could answer my question. Anyway she gave me the specs for the driver and mine is about 1/16" short. Anyway after I relubed and assembled the gun it seems to work better now. I was impressed by stanleys tech. support, toll free number, and people that know the tools inside out.
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Seems to me the hose diameter is simply the reload (pressure) time. The pressure must be above a value - the manual states operation between...
Mine took a while to adjust - I think I did but wasn't 100% happy. I've shot less (way less) than a spool of nails - have a large box full of new ones.
Martin
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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No.
IF you don't have a hairline split in your piston "O" ring on the gun, then you should look to your compressor/regulator setup it could be fouled or broken. As could the gauge. All are easy fixes.
If the gun shoots all your nails regardless of size leaving 1/4" out, then you aren't getting enough pressure to drive the nail.
Look closely at your gun. If it has the specs on the gun, you will probably find that the gun says to not exceed 100 psi. Some of the newer ones are 125 psi, but one of mine is 100, the other is 125. Shooting beyond the recommended pressure will split the rings pretty easy. At any rate, 100psi should do fine to sink a 12d.
Make sure you oil the gun. I don't think any of the bigger guns have teflon seals yet. As for me, I drench my framers and utility nailers with oil. It makes a mess for a bit, but doesn't hurt the gun.
If it doesn't sink then nail every single time you shoot a 12d and you aren't just missing when you are waiting for the compressor to catch up, then my vote would be the gauge/regulator part of the equation.
But before I did anything, I would look at the magazine and make sure I had it set properly. When I change nail sizes in my Bostitch utility coil nailer, I have to rotate (dial up or down) the entire magazine then lock it into place as marked for the nail size I am using. This positions the nail correctly in the feed mechanism to be struck by the driver.
If I don't do this, the nails don't sink correctly as the are either too high or too low in the feeder teeth. DAMHIKT.
Just a few thoughts...
Robert
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