Splitting Granite


Hi All,
Not sure which forum to post this on ... but I have an outcropping of ledge in my yard that I would like to reduce in size. I'm told there is a fluid that can be used, other than water, to pour into drilled holes and let mother nature take over during the winter months to freeze it, and ultimately break/split/crack the ledge that is too close to my barn to blast. Does anybody know of what I'm talking about?
Thanks in advance,
--Jim
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Spike9458 wrote:

Dave
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Straw colored, slightly oily and downright cranky when jostled. Good idea.
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Jim,
I googled for an old post regarding an expansive agent that you pour into holes that you drill. Couldn't find the post, but I did find the company that makes it.
Try this. http://www.archerusa.com/product_dexpan_en1.html
Then, scrolled further down the article and realized it wasn't an old usenet post, but rather a Fine Homebuilding article, which is referenced in the link.
Happy cracking....
jc

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Thanks, I think that's what I was looking for! The price there on the website is rather elusive though.
--Jim

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Spike9458 wrote:

Water has been used in quarries almost forever.
Why would you use anything else?
Lew
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Time/Season
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He may be in California and is looking for something more friendly to the environment. ;~)
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As long as you're already drilling the holes, why not get a set of wedges and feathers and just split the face by hand? I found an example of the wedges here (http://www.miconproducts.com/wedges.html ). I saw this done on This Old House once upon a time. When this was done in the old days, the hard part was drilling the hole. When they did it on TOH, the pro used a pneumatic drill with a special bit that had a hole in it that compressed air blew into. Apparently, it did a better job than just a regular stone drill. Could be more fun than waiting for a liquid to maybe or maybe not split it for you.
todd
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Todd Fatheree wrote:

in one size. http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.aspx?c=2&p335&cat=2,2180,41007&ap=1 Joe
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This is a woodworking forum. Drill, drive dry wood, wet and wait.
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Note that this is an excellent way to give yourself a bad case of permanent lung damage. If you use such a drill, be sure to wear suitable protective gear.
Serious professional drills pump water down the bore, not compressed air, an innovation the mining industry adopted after killing off the first generation of pneumatic drill users.
John
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Well, I'm not sure this is a serious professional type of job. And somehow, I doubt a one-time use is likely to cause "permanent lung damage". And I'm pretty sure this granite outcropping is outdoors, so I think my anxiety level would be fairly low. If I were doing it, I'd probably still wear a mask, but I don't think I'd inflate the risk to the level of someone spending 8 - 10 hours a day in a hole.
todd
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http://demolitiontechnologies.com /
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Probably not, but you might want to google "acute silicosis" before getting too confident. Granitic rocks are the worst for this.

Wearing a mask would be very wise. Dumping water down the hole periodically is also a good idea (besides keeping down the dust, it also cools the bit & helps clear the chips out of the hole).
John
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On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 20:37:46 -0500, "Spike9458"

Water, but use wooden wedges too.
If you use plain water, then the force is symmetrical and the split can go anywhere. If you take a strong (high crush strength, like elm or oak) timber that's well-seasoned, then make it _bone_dry_ by leaving it on the stove for a day or two, then you do two things. Firstly you make a more powerful force, secondly you make one you can direct. Pack the plugs into the holes so that there's a gap on the side towards adjacent holes. Do it right and you get a neat zipper between the holes. The "wedges" should also be near-parallel and well-fitting in the holes, except for a flat planed on opposing sides. I used 24mm, because it's the biggest long drill I had without getting an expensive core bit.
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