so a dummy buys a ras...

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That's not the same as the inherent safety (or lack thereof) of the tool.

Neither am I. If my RAS had a wobbly carriage and a floppy arm, I'd either fix it, or replace it with one that was more solid.

"Concept" is a matter of opinion, and I won't argue with you over that. We can agree to disagree there.
"Lack of accuracy" I won't argue with, either. Rumpty may take issue with this, but IMO they are *not* as accurate as a table saw. And they're more difficult to set accurately, too.
"Inherent danger" is where you jump off the cliff. Operated with the proper care, a RAS is no more dangerous than a TS (and IMO safer for most operations).
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I'm not getting in the middle of this.....
--
Rumpty

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I've never seen you shy away from a RAS argument before. C'mon...go for it.
Dave
Rumpty wrote:

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Naw, I don't argue, the RAS is more accurate, easier to use, safer, can do more, but I'm not going to argue.
--
Rumpty

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ah, yeah...ok...well at least you kept the ball in play. :)
Doug?
Dave
Rumpty wrote:

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Hey, if youse guys want to keep walking around with your head up in the clouds thinking the RAS is a worthless POC, be my guest! I make good $ with mine, and if you walk into my shop don't go looking for the TS because there ain't none.
--
Rumpty

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LOL! Point taken.
Dave
Rumpty wrote:

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No disagreement here on most of it... but I'd like to see an explanation of the "more accurate" comment. I don't think so... but it could be that Rumpty can teach me a few things about setting up a RAS.

--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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A simple crosscut with the RAS on say a 6' board, pull the tape, mark your point with your razor knife, slide it up to the fence's cut line and make your cut. That mark made with your razor knife is split down the middle, dead on accurate! All made within 10 seconds or so. Do the same with your TS or CSMS.........
--
Rumpty

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It is sure more accurate for cutting dados in bookcase sides than a TS sled!
Grant
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Why do you say that, Grant? I've had no problem with accuracy on my Unisaw with rips, crosscuts, dados, whatever.
Dave
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If the depth of the dado needs to be accurate, the table saw is a better choice. If the thickness between the bottom of the dado and the outside wall of the panel is important, the RAS would be a better choice. IOW..of making gangs of bookcases out of irregular thickness plywood (as I have for the local library system) The RAS will give a much more predictable outcome. You can accurately regulate the length of the shelves and the dado depth will vary with the thickness of the plywood.
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Depth functions on a "DeWalt/OSC" RAS are as accurate as any TS. You just gotta know how to make proper depth adjustments.
--
Rumpty

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His post indicates the reality that depth of dado is determined by the face from which it's referenced. RAS gives consistent remainder, table or router, referencing as they do to the opposite face, give consistent depth.
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Rumpty wrote:

As with any saw, initial set up is critical. With the RAS once the time and effort are taken to insure that the table and fence are properly set up, even my old Craftsman will provide a uniform cutting depth. Of course, if you don't do it right to begin with or have junion out in the shop sitting or jumping on the carriage arm, your mileage may vary.
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There's one additional requirement for uniform depth of a dado cut: the top face of the stock being cut must be parallel to the bottom face. If these two surfaces are parallel, then a properly-tuned RAS /can/ produce results as good as those produced by a TS.
However, it's probably worth pointing out that the table saw will provide a uniform depth of cut without this requirement.
Any discussion of which tool best cuts a particular dado really needs to first reach agreement as to which workpiece face is to be the reference face.
-- Morris
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Rumpty wrote:

And under no circumstances should you use the RAS table as a work bench. Or as storage for heavy stuff. Or as a seat for a tired butt. Obvious but not always.     DAMHIKT,     jo4hn
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I have been known to stand on mine, BUT I have a 2 ply, ply top with steel reinforcing and it does not move.
--
Rumpty

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Rumpty wrote: <snip>

2 ply plywood? Two pieces of 3 or 5 or 7 (or more) ply plywood?
R, Tom Q.
--
R,
Tom Q.

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Tom,
My 7790 uses 11 ply ply and my MB's use MDF. All reinforced with 5/8 steel strip epoxied into matching groves. The plys are glued together with white glue. Of course there is a 1/4" sacrificial top nailed into place.
--
Rumpty

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