Sketchup 7

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I have been an AutoCAD LT user for 12 or so years. I have been using CAD programs since 1986. Never have I run across and learned so quickly to draw on a CAD type program as with Sketchup. 3D is SIMPLE with Sketchup. I down loaded it years ago and removed it, down loaded it again and forgot about it, uninstalled it once again and finally down loaded version 6 and after putzing with it 2 or 3 more times discovered that it was OK. Version 7 was released a few months or so ago and it is even better. It seems that there are fewer errors and problems and designing on it now seems very intuitive once I learned to assemble my drawings with components, thanks Swingman. Anyway, you can now print drawings to scale in version 7. For woodworking IMHO this was a major missing feature in the earlier versions . It seems that I always needed to transfer a curve or something complicated in full size scale to the actual wood. Now that is possible. So if you have not upgraded to version 7, what are you waiting for?
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Leon wrote:

I have version 7, but it still won't handle the simple shape I was working on (with a different package) when your post popped up.
I'll put what I have so far on abpw, and perhaps you can tell me how I can make it in SU7.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Draw the 3 straight line segments at the corners on each side. Draw the arcs between them. Push/Pull on the surface to drag it out into 3d. Unless there's something I'm missing about the drawing, that's an easy one.
-Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

You /are/ missing something. The (surface and matching plywood rib) curve is a parabola with a curve length of exactly eight feet with the focus at the point midway between the edges. There aren't any circular arcs other than the ends of the small tubes, which haven't been 'extruded' yet.
I tried making a cone and sectioning to produce a parabolic curve, but still had the problem of making the length of the curve come out right. 'Taint as easy as it looks. :-p
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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"Morris Dovey" wrote

powered pool company many years ago. We used metal coated mylar and set the panels into a frame to support them. We thermoformed them in a vacuum forming machine. The machine was home built.
We would cut the shape we wanted in metal and use that to form the plaster mold. Mount that mold on the thermoforming bed and heat the plastic. Turn on the vacuum and the panels were instantly formed. Trim them and collect eight of them to make on parabolic reflector.
Ahhhh....., the wild visionary days of a mispent youth. Dreaming of riches in the solar heating biz. But I got it out of my system a long time ago. I am much better now. :-)
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Lee Michaels wrote:

'Tis. You can see photos of a half-width prototype at
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/Heat.html
These are being used to heat the hot head of a fluidyne engine. You can see a photo of a low temperature (and low-efficiency) prototype at the bottom of
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/Dyne.html
and concept drawings of the next generation at
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Stirling/Fluidyne.html
Converting the solar radiation to heat is easy - using the heat from a concentrator with only 32 ft^2 of mirror to produce more than 1 hp is "interesting".
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Ever consider a linear fresnel reflector on a small scale? The simplicity appeals to me. http://www.nrel.gov/csp/troughnet/pdfs/2007/odonnell_ausra_clrf.pdf
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Robatoy wrote:

I've considered it - and think it's a great idea for some applications larger than the one I'm working on.
My goal is something simple enough that anyone, anywhere can assemble with a screwdriver and have running in ten or fifteen minutes using a single graphics-only instruction sheet.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Okay. I googled "google sketchup parabola" and got all kinds of stuff.
http://groups.google.com/group/SketchUp3d/browse_thread/thread/38377246792deaf7/a2b4c3205f3f5c3d?lnk=raot
Normally I use sketchup to visualize, not necessarily get an exact drawing. So something like that a simple arc would probably be fine to get what I need from it. Now that I know I can actually generate scale drawings I may use it a bit more for creating templates that need to be exact. But my models are never complete. This is what I'm working on now:
http://www.krtwood.com/progression2.skp
Not remotely complete as far as construction details. The edges of the top are natural but a simple angle is good enough for modeling. On the top those circles are dished out with the 'disher' I talked about elsewhere, I could have spent time trying to figure out how to model that but I don't care because I already know what it looks like. The side panels are actually curved, wasn't sure how I was going to actually do that so I modeled it flat to be sure that would look good too. When I first headed to the shop a single column of drawers spanned the whole width. After I decided to split it after seeing how wide those drawers were going to be I went back and modeled my concept for curving things to make sure that was going to look right. I got what I needed out of it. I'm going to have a whole lot of fun trying to fit those drawer fronts in a couple days though :)
The main thing that annoys me is the dimensioning tool that doesn't move the dimension outside when there isn't enough room which then becomes unreadable.
-Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

http://groups.google.com/group/SketchUp3d/browse_thread/thread/38377246792deaf7/a2b4c3205f3f5c3d?lnk=raot
Interesting!
I'd really like to see some photos of the finished top in place. That'll be quite a feature.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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"Morris Dovey" wrote

Double click on the one you want to change and type in the following, depending upon which side you want it:
<>\n or \n<>
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www.e-woodshop.net
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"Morris Dovey" wrote

Better explanation than my previous:
http://finewoodworking.taunton.com/item/7039/dimensioning-your-drawings-a-couple-quick-tips
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Just the sort of intuitive thing that doesn't need any documentation! There's a setting in there that will *hide* the dimension if it doesn't fit... yeah that's useful.
It just downloaded an update and there's nada about what it updated.
-Kevin
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On Feb 26, 1:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

Oh sure, now that I say that they put out release notes. Just bug fixes.
-Kevin
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Hides ?? Read it again ... function is to place the dimension above or below the lines instead of in between, NOT "hide" them.
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"Swingman" wrote

Them wimmin folks can hide anything!
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Actually there's a better way of doing it so you don't have to type that in. Go to Window -> Model Info -> Dimensions. Under Dimension set to "Align to dimension line" to either above or outside. 'Outside' appears to just be below.
The hide function I was talking about is under "expert dimension settings"
-Kevin
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I don't know if it is a better way but as you point out it is possible to do default them that way. Most often, the lettering between the arrows is the best location. Personally I think a leader with the lettering to the out side of one of the extension lines would be better.
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On Thu, 26 Feb 2009 13:07:29 -0600, "Leon"

Right click the dimension and select "Text Position" from the popup menu.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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wrote:

Well thank you for that Tom!. Not quite what I was looking for but certainly addresses my preference of location for the lettering. Being from the old school way of training, to-square and triangles, I would prefer to see the leader between the lettering and the extension/dimension line, but this certainly addresses where I wanted to see the lettering.
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