Simple drawer glides - is this a bad design?

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On 5/26/2014 10:48 AM, Edward A. Falk wrote:

That will work but to remention what others have or may have said,
1. You want pretty close tolerances so that there will be as little side to side wiggle as possible.
2. Tight tolerances between the cabinet slides to drawer will keep the drawer from tipping as much. The more the drawer tips the more friction you will encounter. also the tighter the tolerances and less drawer tipping you have the farther you can pull the drawers out.
3. Use HARD wood for the drawer top and bottom edges and the cabinet runners. And then "wax" the mating surfaces.
4. I would strongly suggest that the cabinet side slides be dado'ed in. You don't want to rely on screws alone to hold them in place.
These drawers are almost 16" deep and can be pulled out about 14 inches before they begin to exhibit any drag or tilt.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/6485169951/in/set-72157630857421932
In this example the drawer chest side of the slides are dado'ed in and the drawer sides have groves so that the chest slide engages the side of the drawer. Again tight tolerances enables for the drawers to pull out almost completely before they begin to tilt.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/4335052930/in/set-72157630857421932
In this example the tolerances allow the drawer to be pulled out to with in 1" before it begins to tilt and they are 13,3/4" deep.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8615323816/in/set-72157630857421932
And of course consistency in size counts too.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8600953399/
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On Monday, May 26, 2014 10:48:56 AM UTC-5, Edward A. Falk wrote

"... - is this a bad design?"
I'm sure you didn't mean it that way, but the wording caught my sense for p erspective and, sometimes, I sense some younger/novice woodworkers (as myse lf) are "influenced", a bit, with that kind of wording. And this idea appl ies to other fields of subject matter.
Let's not say "bad design". That "negative" connotation is misleading and kinna sets the stage, possibly, for an incorrect mindset. Lets say "improv ed design". A log, to roll stones on, to make pyramids, is essentially a wheel and a wheel is a great design. Sometimes, I ask the kids "What is th e best way to cut this board: a hand saw, a circular saw or a table saw?", in order to get them to think, aiming for a positive mindset. Any of the s aws will cut the board, but one might make for a better "technique", than a nother. There is no "bad" saw.
With the selection of products, suggested by others, and including your lev el of skills, try to improve on your "bad design" concept by selecting thos e products that make for the best results, for your drawers, and try an adv anced woodworking technique (skill), for yourself, if applicable.
That "bad whatever" kinna strikes me as incorrect or negative. I've caught myself "practicing" that negativeness, labeling, at times, also. I dislik e it, when I see that "bad" connotation, or something similar, within mysel f. Your trying something new or advanced is a positive.
Think positive!
Okay, Sorry for the "rant". I'm probably a bit out of line, but I wondered if there was a hint of that mindset in your planning, etc. I hope I'm wro ng.
Sonny
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