silicone glue

I am making wood frams for a mirror the instructions say apply silicone to small pieces of wood to attach them to the mirror. I have never used this type of glue before. Does it really work and how is it applied.
thanks in advance
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On Mon, 24 Nov 2008 01:19:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It is the same stuff as "GE Silicone II" caulking compound and can be found at your local home supply. You could also use "RTV Gasket Sealant", although the colors available are limited. RTV is available from your local auto parts store. regards, Joe.
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On Tue, 25 Nov 2008 04:24:39 -0800, Joe Brophy

Using silicone for gluing wood is a bad idea. It renders the project completely unrepairable, and ANY contact with the wood surface will leave that area unable to be painted or finished in any way.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sounds like decorative rather than structural pieces.
If decorative, NBD.
If structural, I wouldn't.
YMMV
Lew
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Joe Brophy wrote:

Watch what solvents are used in any type of adhesive applied to mirrors to be sure it won't de-silver the mirror.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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the normal silicone purchased is an acid cure, and WILL discolor the mirror eventually. you can get non-acid cure silicone. a bigbox may have mirror silicone, but i'd ask at a window place instead. i have found non-acid cure silicones at ace hardware but you have to read the labels to find the right one.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/Gal6606_Chani_Artss_Gallery.asp
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that isn't correct. it is mildew-icide free. it still smells like vinegar, which is acid cure silicone.
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Not the last tube I bought.

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I use a lot of the stuff to bond polycarbonate glazing to wood. I buy it in 10-ounce tubes and apply a bead with a caulking gun, then use a spreader (finger) to maximize the contact area. When cured it's rubbery and fairly tough - exactly what I want to deal with vapor leakage, moisture, and uneven thermal expansion/contraction of joined components.
The DAP (Dow) silicone caulk I buy comes with a 50-year guarantee. I use it primarily as a long-life sealant rather than as a structural glue - and I shield the glued joint from UV with aluminum trim.
For my purposes, it works really well. I'd suggest buying a tube and doing a couple of experimental gluings to see if it'll do the job you want...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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