Setting a wagon tire

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That's it! Just tell them you are resurrecting an ancient practice that requires sacrificing a goat.
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Jim Wilkins wrote: ...

Not that ancient around here, it seems from the number entrails bags we get in the fields and road ditches... :(
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You've got 27" to work with if you put it in diagonally. There's a third dimension to be concerned about, but it's faster to try it than to work on all the calculations.
It doesn't matter if your oven tops out before the wheel has expanded enough, though. (But you knew this.)
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 7/31/2010 9:28 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

How do you figure? If I tilt it up front to back then I've only got the 21 width. If I tilt it side to side then I've only got the 17 depth.

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Pythagorean theorem. This only would work if you've got enough height to stand the wheel vertically across the oven.
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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Yeahbut applies. a standard commercial pizza oven holds typically *six* minimum (16-18") and will hit into the 8-900F range if pushed.
Now, arranging to "borrow' a pizza place's oven, *that's* a whole nuther level of complexity. <grin>
Similarly, it'd take a *really* big ceramics kiln to fit that tire in.
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On Aug 2, 3:58am, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Not at all. Stick a flat metal circle on it, tell the pizza guy that you'll pay him $20 to test out your new invention - The Pizza Magic Oven Ring. Then after the 'test', grab the thing, run outside and start pounding the wheel together in his parking lot.
R
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Robert Bonomi wrote:

Cassano's used to sell a 40" party pizza, but you had to order it three days before the party. The price was about $30, 25 years ago. I always wanted to see how much I could eat, in one try. When I was in my 20s, we used to have pizza eating contests. We had a half hour for lunch, which gave us 20 minutes to eat. I could put away one and a half 18" thick crust pizza and two large glasses of Pepsi. I weighted 175 pounds. The only one in the group who ever beat me weighed close to 400 pounds. :)
http://cassanos.com /

A lot of places use belt drive ovens these days. They look like early hot air reflow soldering machines.

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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

nah, that's a pretty average one. mine will take a 21" round with about 1/2" to spare on the sides.
you might call around to some ceramic or glass artists, a ceramic supply store, or one of those paint on ceramics mall places, to 'borrow' some heat for a while. the charge for a firing would be only a few dollars.
regards, charlie http://www.glassartists.org/ChaniArts
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Simple, make the ring 1/8 small. Roll to shape and butt weld. Dress with a grinder and heat with a rose bud acetylene torch . Set in place and let it cool. No smoke, no noise and no problems. Steve

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On 7/31/2010 10:30 AM, Steve Lusardi wrote:

Can the whole two foot diameter wheel be brought to temperature at once with a rose bud torch?

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On 7/31/2010 11:14 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Thinking about it, this is probably the way to go. Push me off center to get an oxyacetylene rig.

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Or build a Morris Dovey solar collector and heat it up parabolically.
R
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RicodJour wrote: ...

chuckle...
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Six guys with six torches? When I was more actively doing HVAC. The boss and I would chit chat while we used two torches and two rolls of solder to assemble 1 1/4 copper pipe for boiler heat systems.
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On 7/31/2010 9:01 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Looking at this further, I may need a bigger tank than I'd want to handle to get this whole thing to red heat with oxyacetylene. Mongo weed burner is looking like the right tool.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Or maybe two of them. One on each side would sure make for a quicker job.
--

Richard Lamb



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On 7/31/2010 10:30 AM, Steve Lusardi wrote:

Thinking on this yet more, any recommendation on a starter setup for acetylene? Should I go with the Lincoln package that Lowes and Home Despot and the like have, or find a welding store and ask for advice or is there a standard first set that everbody has or what?
If I'm going to spend the money I may as well get set up with something decent that can grow with me.
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wrote:

Check your local Craigslist or put on an add for a torch, tips, ROSEBUD and gauges.
Most of the sets Ive found here in California are the tiny a/c service bottles. Get the biggest set of bottles (and cart) you can find.
Gunner
"
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to heat something up to bend it I used propane. Now if you have other uses for it, OK. But if this is the only thing you are going to do with it, consider propane.
The welding rigs you get at the big box stores are cheapened to specs by the stores. They wanted to sell something at a particular price point. The stuff you buy at a real welding store is much better quality. Of course, you pay for that quality.
I would, at the very least, go to a welding store or two and talk to them. They are far more knowledgable and can steer you in the right direction.
Another thing to consider, the cost of tanks. Each area has their own particular laws concerning tanks. Where I am, you cannot own them. You must rent them. And they can only be transported in an upright position in a secure carrier of some kind. There may be restrictions on even having tanks at home. And if you do, you may need to post signs and notify the fire department. Again, each area is different. This is another reason to talk to the local welding store. They know all the regulations for the local area. They need to if they want a viable business.
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