Sears will gradually disappear

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Regardless of origin, I've never been overly impressed when I've gone into pawn shops. The prices listed are so close to new retail, it just isn't worth the risk or hassle. If they are marking high in order to haggle, I've got better things to do with my time than that.
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I "outfitted" my "new"...lol since my old shop was the trunk of my car...shop just after I got of of College and the military in the Mid 60's...
20 mile drive into town to Sears, Wards, & JC Penny or a 150 mile hike to the big city that had a store that sold expensive machines... Sears offered better tools then the two other stores...PLUS like you said that little plastic card was my savior at the time...
I still use my belt/disc sander and am still in LOVE woith my floor model Drill press... any yes I still have my RAS ...the other Sears tools have long since been replaced...
But it was more the assumed quality, that darn Plastic card, and the fact that SEARS was just down the road rather then 150 miles down the Highway in the big city...
Bob Griffiths of course today I honestly fell like I now live in the Big City...More people locally then cows, No more covered bridges for sure... .
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You WERE. Twenty years ago. Hand tools, anyway. I'm still using Craftsman wrenches and the like, that I bought 25-30 years ago, and they're still good tools.
Farther back than that, the power tools were good, too.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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In the fifties, I bought sockets from Crescent and from Craftsman. The Craftsman sockets would take more abuse and Sears would exchange a damaged one, no questions asked. Don't know about today but then, the "perceived" quality didn't have anything to do with "made in America" or advertising.
bob g.
Ba r r y wrote:

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They turned me down for a credit card in 1986. I had just gotten out of the army. Had a perfect credit rating before going in. As ex military though, I couldn't be trusted.

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On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 14:34:52 GMT, Ba r r y

Yeah, mine's a lot smaller than it was 15 years ago.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 08:47:35 -0800, Tim Douglass

According to your website, that appears to be by choice, no?
Barry
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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 18:41:01 GMT, Ba r r y

True. But the unfortunate truth is that in many areas and industries wages have actually gone down over the last 20 years. 25 years ago I made more per hour as a drywall finisher than they make now in this area - in fact I made more than twice what they are making. Granted, there are differences between Seattle area and Central Oregon, but a lot of the trades are paying less now than they used to. Lots of high-tech jobs are also paying less than 10 years ago. I just wanted to ding the OP a bit about costs and wages.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 22:02:55 -0800, Tim Douglass wrote:

...and yet, the average hourly wage continues to rise and is at an all time high, even adjusted for inflation. Some employment areas are over supplied and others under supplied, thus some wages drop and some increase, but overall folks are making more money. The info is available on the bls.gov site.
-Doug
--

To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


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What pee's me off about KMart/Sears is that they filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy a year or 2 ago. I had 3,000 dollars worth of their common stock and was told it was now worthless and to go ahead and claim it as a loss on my income tax. And now, low and behold they go ahead and acquire Sears and the so-called future looks bright for KMart. All of the sudden they got cash to buy out Sears and us stock holders of a year or so ago are screwed and can not recoup our money. It just doesn't seem fair. I'm thinking about writing the SEC for an explanation. As far as I am concerned, before I trade at KMart they can go pee up a rope. It feels good to blow off steam now and then.

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On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 15:51:05 +0000, Bob wrote:

You could'a bought back into the re-organized company last year in May at about $15/share. If you'd doubled up your investment of $3000 for a total of $6000, it'd be worth $21,000 today for a tidy profit of $15,000.
<http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=KMRT&t=2y
- Doug
--

To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


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wrote:

When companies go bankrupt, the common stock holders usually lose everything. The people who hold the company's debt (in the form of bonds, usually) have to be repaid before the stockholders. That's the price stockholders pay for the chance to make a lot more than the bondholders; they also risk losing everything.
The KMart of today shares nothing with the previous KMart corporation except the name. In this case, the Kmart's creditors got the remains of the company, reorganized, and reissued new stock.
--
Hank Gillette

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That's altogether the wrong attitude. You should be happy to give up your money to further the interest of corporate America.

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"The real estate occupied by the company is worth more than the stock value. Thus it makes sense to sell of pieces to recover the value of the real estate"
This is typical of the cursory insight provided by the likes of Forbes. The analysis assumes a static equity valuation, clearly a weak assumption, particularly given that the catalyst for the article is probably the merger. If we assume the first sentence is true, the question should be "why?". It must be that the real estate is more valuable in some other use, than it is to Sears, as currently configured. The new strategy, the merger, etc. were undertaken, presumably, to add value to the company. At some stock valuation, the stores will exceed that value of the real estate in some other use. I have no opinion on whether the strategy will pay off in the long run, but is is silly to assume that liquidation is the optimal path, as Forbes has apparently concluded.
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On 11 Dec 2004 09:52:57 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@surfree.com wrote:

KMart has already sold off stores located on properties with high values.
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GregP wrote:

Hey no problem here then. Sears sits in a mall where the other two anchor stores are empty, and the whole thing is perpetually almost vacant.
Ours should be one of the last to go then. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Hehehe. Sears was the purchaser of many of these (I believe 66 was the last count).
Kevin Daly
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On 13 Dec 2004 12:16:57 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnospam (Kevin Daly) wrote:

That's right ! I forgot about that...
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On 11 Dec 2004 09:52:57 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@surfree.com wrote:

One other bit of questionable analysis: since most Sears stores are in shopping centers, my understanding was that this was lease space. Sears could vacate, but gain no appreciation in value because it is the mall owner, not Sears that owns the building and the real estate.
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Many mall anchor stores are owned by the tenant. The mall only owns the common space and the non-anchor stores.
Brian Elfert
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