Sears will gradually disappear

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An article in the recent Forbes magazine explains the Sears will gradually disappear. The real estate occupied by the company is worth more than the stock value. Thus it makes sense to sell of pieces to recover the value of the real estate. It cannot be done all at once due to taxes. Much of the gain can be used ot offset loses from K-mart. I realize that much of this newsgroup considers Sears products to be greatly inferior. Many of us initially purchased Craftsman tools when that was all we could afford.
The head of K-mart is not a man who has made his name in the retail markets. He has made his reputation by being a trader.
Dick
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Sears makes emough money through the Sears Bank, their real estate company, Lens Crafters and other interests, they probably don't give a shit if they sell another tool. Here's a hint. When I was in China a couple years ago, there was a big building with the name Craftsman on it. Supposedly, where Craftsman products are made. You'd have a better chance of getting into a nuclear plant, because the Craftsman plant is where they have their child and slave labor making clothes, not tools.
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Handsome Stranger blurts:

Do you ever gag on your own bullshit?
Charlie Self "Man is the only animal that blushes. Or needs to." Mark Twain
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Charlie Self wrote:

Aw, cumon Charlie, tell us how you really feel. %-)
Dave in Fairfax
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Dave Leader
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On 11 Dec 2004 08:51:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I was thinking that same thing. Craftsman plant. Ha, ha, ha.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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I fellow would die of old age looking for a manufacturing plant with a Sears or Craftsman logo on it, seeing that Sears does not manufacture a thing they sell! Greg
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LRod wrote:

Probably was such a building--if you read the fine print it was probably the "happy joyful lucky craftsman company" or some such (love those Oriental names) and had nothing whatsoever to do with Sears.

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--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Yes, it is in the same industrial park as the Kenmore plant.
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wrote:

complete with "child and slave labor?"
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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We have a lot of child labor here in Republic of Cali, so it's a none issue. Would you consider getting paid 90 cent per day for brick laying in Asia slavery? Factory workers get paid a bit more tho.
LRod wrote:

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wrote:

Isn't that right next to the Diehard factory?
Barry
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On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 17:40:25 GMT, Ba r r y

Would be, but they couldn't get it started.

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wrote in message

And The "Kenmore" plant is right next to the park where the little Inca Dove birdies cooo "Whirlpool" all the live long day.

No... that's off to the left behind the Bruce Willis statue

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-- Steve
www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
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On 11 Dec 2004 08:51:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

come on, Charlie... quit holding back and tell 'em how you really feel.. rofl
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Charlie Self wrote:

I guess on your trips to China you saw quite a bit, huh Charley?
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wrote:

Nowadays that theory really dosen't hold water.
My 20+ year old Craftsman items were purchased because I thought they were better than department store tools at the time of purchase. The Craftsman stuff was usually MORE EXPENSIVE than a typical department store brand, not, "the only thing I could afford". I truly THOUGHT that I was buying a high quality tool.
I also had a Sears credit card, as they gave them to everyone, including 18 year olds who barely had a job. Back then, Visa denied those folks. Sears sold only Craftsman, no DeWalt, Makita, etc... Also, "pro" brands, like DeWalt, Bosch, Porter Cable, and Makita were only sold by "tool dealers", often at list price.
Competition from home centers, Al Gore's Internet, and among the brands themselves, changed all of that. 9.6v Makita drills are the same price now as they were 15 years ago, but are paychecks sure aren't!
Over the years, I've realized that I often was buying overpriced department store quality tools. Craftsman of the late 70's and 80's was Black and Decker department store crap, but came with a blow molded case.
Nowadays I see two levels of Craftsman tools:
* The "Pro" version, such as the rebadged Bosch router. With today's BORGs and online tool sources, the Craftsman version is often more expensive than the native brand version. This tool is marketed at the guy who remembers when Craftsman was a good tool, but has explored the other brands.
* The "yuppie" version, usually aimed at some non-existent price point. These tools are Kmart quality, with bells, whistles, and Bob Vila to sell it for slightly more than the Kmart version. With experience, the bells and whistles usually prove to be gimmicks. If it's more expensive, it must be better, right? They fall in between the cheapie and the lower-end home center version. Companies like Ryobi seem to pretty adept at meeting these challenges, with a better quality homeowner quality tool.
Many of us "tool snobs" have a pile of Craftsman tools that suck, and in some cases are totally unfit for the job. These tools have been replaced with usable examples, so we spent much more in the long run. I try really hard to help others avoid doing the same Someone with limited funds is better off with pawn shop name brand tools.
Screw me once, shame on you, screw me twice, shame on me! <G>
Barry
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On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 14:34:52 GMT, Ba r r y

With the buying patterns you just described, don't you wonder just how is it that pawnshops end up with these tools ?
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wrote:

Union jobs, at least here in the Northeastern USA.
On big commercial construction projects, all new tools are usually bid into the job. At the end of the job, the trades people pick by seniority what they want. Much of it goes to pawn shops, as these folks already have what they want from other jobs.
The rest of them are stolen from jobsites, vehicles, or home shops, or pawned by legitimate owners with financial problems.
Barry
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On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 14:59:14 GMT, Ba r r y

I hadn't heard of the construction handouts. I assumed that most of them were stolen, which is why I never go to pawn shops. It sounds like I should take a look some time.
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wrote:

On big union commercial jobs it's apparently easier and cheaper to buy all new small power tools and abandon it at the end of the job. During the job, the security people take a "nothing leaves" rule. Between jobs, it's difficult and expensive for contractors to store the stuff. This might also be a regional thing.
I guess this would be how you buy enough DeWalt for a free Corvette. <G>
FWIW, I didn't believe this story the first time I heard it, but it's been confirmed by many independent sources.
Barry
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