Saw Stop

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Craig, where have you been hiding? :~) Nice to hear from another person with extended experience on the machine.
Thank you for the comments.
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On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 23:48:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

They have nothing to do with hand speed, which is the statement I responded to.
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The point is that your hand shouldn't be anywhere near the blade, no matter the speed.
scott
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On Sun, 01 Oct 2006 16:34:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

I'm totally jiggy with that, as well as a believer in SawStop technology. I'm big on push blocks and jigs, so that I'm comfortable without a SawStop in my one-man shop.
SawStop firings are about _accidents_!
However, all of the demos always have the hot dog moving so slowly, not like my hand might be moving when ripping.
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In no way did I mean to denigrate the Saw Stop. My point was that you can still get hurt with it.
In retrospect my answer was probably more reflexive than it should have been. When I teach safety I emphasize that nothing is completely safe and I show how it is possible to get hurt no matter how far fetched.
I once had an employee raise a guard and put her hand under a cutter then flip both the on switch and the master safety switch while her hand was under the cutter. When we designed the machine we were sure no one was going to get hurt with it. Fortunately she wasn't hurt badly because of the safety aspect but she was still hurt.
When we build equipment, we never tell people it is safe. We always emphasize how to use it safely. We also always design in as much safety as we can.
tom
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O D wrote:

Tiny.
If you want to spend some money to upgrade safety, a quickly removable and replaceable crown guard and a riving knife will give you nearly as much safety for a whole lot less money.
OTOH, they're not bad saws or badly priced if you're buying a new saw of similar quality.
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O D wrote:

No, you don't have to buy SawStop blades. Any 10" standard blade will do. (However, I have seen comment here on the wreck that the Freud adjustable dado cannot be used, likely because it is marginally over 8" in diameter at some, or all, width settings.) My Freud stackable dado is fine.
Should the cartridge fire, you not only have to buy a new cartridge, but also replace the blade which is destroyed in the process.
Changing from a standard blade to dado, or vice versa, takes an additional 30 seconds or so.
The blade insert is complex and expensive and not easy to duplicate. So far I have not seen any third party inserts for the SawStop for sale. The dado insert is made of walnut and mine was badly warped on receipt. The standard insert is phenolic - no problems.
The manual that comes with the saw is by far the most comprehensive I have ever seen for a power tool of this level of complexity but it is full of errors - annoying things like the index pointing to the wrong page numbers, parts numbers missing from exploded view diagrams, etc.
The shiny black finish on the saw and extension table shows every bit of sawdust. I'll leave it to you to determine if that is a plus on minus.
All in all, I am very happy with the saw.

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A co-worker of mine cut his right index finger badly on his tablesaw- for the surgery to repair cost $8000.00, not counting emergency room services, rehab, doctor's office visits and lost wages. Gene

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O D wrote:

(I have not read all of the thread)
I wonder how the force of the high speed spinning blade is disipated? I am betting that you have to replace more than the blade and brake unit, like say motor shaft, motor mounts, motor adjustment screws and anything else the torque throws out of whack.
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Tater wrote:

No, the trunnions, bearings, etc. are built extra heavy to absorb the shock. IIRC, the trunnions alone weigh over 300 pounds.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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)

Its speculation and forming ones opinion from a guess that starts ill informed comments about a tool.
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