Rounding a corner

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WillR wrote:

That sumbitch is ALWAYS mucking things up. I hate that.
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Just found this site and have to jump in with my own comment. Old time traditional woodworkers would have rounded off the corners by marking the line, chipping off the excess with a mortising chisel, rasping it to final shape and sanding. Done in less time than it takes to set up the machinery today. Sometimes progress is an elusive thing. Look at the curvature of a violin. It is still done by hand in the better shops. Bugs
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jo4hn wrote:

We don't need no stinkin' plans!
Dave
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How about free plans???
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miamicuse (in PPmdna82OPgioT_enZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@dsli.com) said:
| I have a piece of oak plywood 3/4" thick 36"x60". I would like to | round the corners into something like a 6" radius. What is the | best way to do this to make it as smooth as possible? I have only | a compound miter saw and a handsaw.
Use your CMS and handsaw to make a trammel or compass and a bowsaw <http://www.geocities.com/plybench/bowsaw.html from scrap, use the compass to mark the 6" corner curves, cut the marked arcs, and sand smooth.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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miamicuse wrote:

I see you've gotten suggestions and sarcasm from both ends of the spectrum, so I'm taking the middle road. Go down to your local Home Depot or Lowes or whatever they have in your town and buy an ORBITAL jigsaw made by Milwaukee, Dewalt, Porter Cable, Bosch or maybe Makita or Hitachi. Don't get Sears, Black & Decker or Ryobi. It's not just that they have a short life, they don't cut good even when brand new. But a good jigsaw is a pleasure to use. Expect to spend about $170 or so. It's more than absolutely necessary for this one project, but I see you post on alt.HomeRepair a lot, so you'll find lots of other uses for it once you have it. A year from now, you'll wonder how you ever got along without it.
DonkeyHody "Don't ever wrestle with a pig. You both get muddy, but the pig likes it."
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Amen. My thoughts exactly. Buy a dang jigsaw and trim close to your line and sand down to the target -- along with a chopsaw, table saw, sander, drill, and router, the jigsaw is a must-have in any shop, and was the next tool I bought after the drill, skil, and sander -- I got along just fine with a drill, skil saw, sander, and jigsaw for an entire library project, rounded corners and all.
I prefer the jigs with an adjustable angle knob on top, along with adjustable speed. You'll love having your jigsaw, and can even set it up for large-scale scroll-sawing if you're slick. And if you have kids... man they'll love the toys you can make with a jigsaw!
- Saul
DonkeyHody wrote:

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Thank you. I have a jigsaw, a cheap Black and Decker I bought five years ago to make cut outs on melamine back splash for outlets, and counter top hole for sink etc... and it did not do a good job - or may be I should say - my skill sucked. I did not feel I have control, I can't see where the saw is going and the saw dust was flying out blocking my view or something. I did not consider doing it for the corners since it will require more control than those rectangular outlet holes. May be I just did not have a good saw, or may be I just sucked at it.
MC

the
this to

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I have one of those. It is a piece of vibrating crap that will now allow you to cut cleanly. Real jig saws start at $100 and peak at about $170 for the top rated Bosch and Milwaukee models.
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I have one of those Black and Decker jigsaws. It's not you. It's the saw. I recently bought a Hitachi. The difference in performance is amazing. You won't regret putting the money into a good saw once you have used it.

round
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miamicuse wrote:

You owe it to your future as a handyman to get your hands on a good quality jig saw. You'll find it a quantum leap above that piece of junk you have now. The saws I mentioned earlier have an orbital action that causes the blade to travel in a hook-like path that makes the cut very agressive when you need it for thick wood. Or you can adjust the orbit so that the blade moves straight up and down for good control. Switchable sawdust blowers will keep your cutline clean and moving counterbalances keep vibration to a minimum.
If you aren't ready to take the plunge based on our advice alone, RENT a good jig saw to see what we mean. You don't want to be like the cat in the quote below.
DonkeyHody "We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it - and stop there; lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove-lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again---and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore." - Mark Twain
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[...]

What, the least possible difference that still *is* a difference?
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Sorry, I don't understand your question.
DonkeyHody
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I think he is saying that there is not a quantum leap in difference unless the first saw had no blade. Really a $90 bench top band saw will cut much better than most jig saws. I am the owner of a Milwaukee jig saw and have used a Bosch. Both being nearly equal in quality of cut I would not put either up against a band saw.
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I have to disagree with that. I have a Black and Decker jig saw. That and a couple of Skil jigsaws were all I had used until recently. I just thought jigsaws were a last resort. Something you dreaded to use unless there was no other choice. After buying my Hitachi, that opinion has changed. There is that much difference. There is no doubt that a bandsaw will give a better cut but if I was going to spend $200.00 or less on a curve cutting tool, I would buy the jigsaw. More versatile and you really can't get much of a bandsaw for that kind of money. In any case, he was talking about a 36"x60" piece. Considering the handling problems, he'd probably do a much better job with the jigsaw.

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Agreed. I originally indicated a coping saw. My intent was to only indicate that the quantum leap was relative for comparing jig saws.
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Leon wrote:

Leon,
I won't try to change your mind about the "quantum leap" issue. It was a figure of speach I won't attempt to defend. I think I called the Black & Decker a piece of junk, and I won't attempt to defend that either. Like Beauty, Junk and Quantum Leaps lie in the eye of the beholder.
But I think any reasonable person who used both would agree that a good orbital jig saw from any of the brands I initially recommended would be a definite improvement over a Black & Decker.
Both of us seem to own both a jig saw and a band saw. I agree that a band saw gives a better quality of cut, but I find my jig saw to be a much more versatile item of equipment, especially for home improvement tasks. Remember that the O.P. is NOT a woodworker, but a handyman. And when his next project involves cutting an even bigger piece of plywood or a long board, the jigsaw would be the tool of choice. If you disagree, well that's why they have chocolate and vanilla, right?
DonkeyHody "Never wrestle with a pig. You'll both get muddy, but the pig likes it."
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I will agree with everything you just said. ;~) In the eyes of the beholder.

Yes I agree again. I own the Milwaukee.
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A quantum leap is a change between two quantum mechanica stats, ususlly between the two closest to each other, in other words a quantum leap is the minimal change that can happen.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Well Doc, after doing a little research, I see that you are right. Wouldn't you know that when Americans try to borrow a term from science, they'd get it backwards? On this side of the pond, what we usually mean by "quantum leap" is a jump from "A" to "B" without passing through any of the points in between. Even then, some would say I was a little too quick to apply the term to the difference between two jig saws. Another habit we have, particularly Southerners, is a tendancy to overstate our case. But hey, everything's relative, right?
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
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