RotoZip Tool - Anyone Using It?

Page 2 of 2  
What I've learned from my Dremel and Rotozip is this... The do everything tool means that you need to buy a new attachment or blade/drill bit for every different surfice/material you work with. At the end of the day the "do everything" tool isn't so cheap. I guess if you only had room for one tool box it might be the tool to keep.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the big Dremel with the large motor - a RotoZip knockoff. Great for drywalls, getting into tight places to flush cut nails and bolts where my recip saw can't. Polish and grind little things. Cut out a slot on a rusted out screw so I could back it out with a screw driver - only tool I had that could do that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Their bits are handy, sometimes, but I don't like the tool quality. After seeing a friend's troubles with his RotoZip I never did buy one. I bought a collet adapter for the bits and I use them in my laminate trimmer or router. Other than making holes in sheetrock the only other thing that I've done with them is to make stand-up cutouts of cartoon characters for church. Using a piece of foam insulation as a backer, the rotozip bits cut through the 1/4 luan to make these quite easily. The foam absorbed the sawdust, protected the bit tip, and minimized chip-out. Following the lines freehand went relatively well if you didn't rush it. Pushing the forward cutting speed resulted in sideways pulling, making it difficult to stay on the line. It turned out much better than trying to make the cuts with a sabre saw.
--
Charley


"Joe Bleau" < snipped-for-privacy@Nospam.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, I was thinking that I just didn't know how to use it but after 13 negative reviews I don't feel so inept anymore. Thanks.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe Bleau wrote:

Google "Troy" and "Rotozip".
I think he even face jointed with his. <G>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The rotozip is excellent- but only for one thing (at least as far as I'm concerned). It's really handy for cutting out holes for outlet boxes, windows and doorways when hanging drywall. What you do is partially screw the full sheet to the wall, then plunge the rotozip into the center of (for example) the outlet box. Cut over until you reach the edge, where you enounter some resistance, and then lift it slowly until it slides over the side of the box. Then you use the box as a guide by zipping around it, and slide it into the new perfectly-formed hole in the drywall and finish screwing the sheet down.
That use justifies the tool, but cutting wood with one is kind of a chore.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most people here don't appreciate the RotoZip, I suspect it's because they don't do the type of work that is comes in handy for. I have the Craftsman rotary tool, and it has served me well for years.
Besides it's obvious use of cutting drywall/panelling, I have performed the following tasks:
Cutting off nails reslotting screws trimming laminate (owning a rotory tool with router base eliminates the need for a laminate trimmer) routing profiles (with 1/4" router bits) cutting holes in sofets, cement fiber siding, plywood cutting out sink holes in formica countertops. removing old grout drilling holes (with drill bits) cutting pipe
I'm sure there are things I have used it for as well, but that's all I can think of right now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Rotozip with the 1/4 in. collet and a carbide bit is perfect for cutting in an outlet box in a ceramic tile wall on a remodel. It is also great for enlarging an undersized hole through plywood using the proper bit. I carry one with me on my service truck. You will run into those situations when it's the only tool to do an oddball cut. When using it to cut in around electrical openings on a drywall job make sure your wires are tucked well back in the box. I have had sheet rockers over zealously grind up my wires as they carelessly zip around to find the mud ring. I usually have to carefully open their rock with a large hammer to pull in a new cable. This usually makes them more careful after they have to go back and repair the holes. Marty
wrote:

Martin (NoxiousDog) Person, *****************************************
Connoisseur of budget meats, electrician, Collector of manure.
http://www.alicia-logic.com
*****************************************
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 03 Feb 2007 12:32:36 -0600, Martin L. Person

Never tried it with an outlet box, but I did find that while the Rotozip *bit* was great for cutting tile, I had a whole lot more luck with it when I put it in a Dremel tool with a flex attachment for cutting holes for plumbing fixtures.
I'm not that familiar with the full Rotozip line, but the ones I've used were all single-speed- and that speed was way too fast for cutting tile, IMO.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 03:47:48 -0600, Prometheus

I have limited space on my service truck, so I carry a very basic model (sans. D-handle, variable speed, etc.) with an assortment of bits for different material that all fit in a small plastic tool box. I'm sure your method is superior, but I'm usually doing a one time install on very short notice (ex. the freezer unit was just delivered and we need it running by lunch rush in an hour!). Its noisy, and messy, but it cuts clean enough to install a cut in box, and any minor sins are covered by the plate. It has enough beef to do tougher jobs as well. An added benefit to the model I carry is that it is relatively inexpensive, should it be stolen on a jobsite. The Flexshaft machine stays home in my personal shop, not to be shared with my tool abusing cohorts. Marty
Martin (NoxiousDog) Person, *****************************************
Connoisseur of budget meats, electrician, Collector of manure.
http://www.alicia-logic.com
*****************************************
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 17:44:09 -0600, Martin L. Person

Sure- No reason why it can't work, I just like the bit running slower. Seems like when I tried it in a standard Rotozip like the one you're describing, it really burned those bits up fast. In the Dremel at the lowest speed, they last a good long time, and I have a bit more control.

Now that, I can certainly understand. Even though a Dremel is hardly an expensive tool, I only use it for tile, and it stayed locked up unless it was in my hand. Now I don't do tile work anymore (though I suppose I would if a side job came up) so it just stays in the basement as a "just in case" tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bought one initially to cut off nails in a ceiling. Worked like a charm.
Have since used a sanding attachment to remove paint in small areas, and it worked as advertised.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As many have mentioned it's versaitality with drywall, I have a new appreciation how well it does that job.
My wife and I had our new house drywalled, we've built the rest...but hired the drywall hanging and finishing, the pro crews are just WAY faster. The hanging crew gave artisan with a rotozip new meaning The way they'd just tack the edges of a sheet, find the ceiling fixtures and in a couple of seconds out plopped a DW puck.
In the ICF construction, I had to add a 3 1/2" OSB nailer at the bottom of the exterior walls. Tacked the top, let the bottom rest on the OSB, never measured just let the bit run on the nailer...trimmed perfectly.
They're amazing to watch...and I did just that...watch as we've busted our hinny on this project and ready for a break.
Like everything...every tool has it's place and it's your responsibility to choose the right tool. I'd never use a rotozip to poke a hole in 1/2 OSB just as I'd never use a reciprocating saw to cut dove tails.
Don't get rid of it....if you do, you'll find that it would of been the cats meow.
Hang in there....
DAC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.