Rolling Pin Ball Bearings.....


Sorry folks for the simpleness of this question! I'm thinking of making around 20 or so rolling pins as Christmas presents. I was planning to use a steel rod through the center which rides in a circular bearing at the end of the pin and the handles would attach to the rod ends. Trouble is, I'm really not sure where to find such bearings. I was thinking of using steel bearings but water would rust them so perhaps nylon? Does anyone have a recommendation as to where I can get these? Cheers, cc
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

Sounds like you are getting too complicated. Why have a bearing at all? Many rollers are solid non-turning handles which just roll in the hand; others just use a wood or marble roller and wood thru the center. A steel rod through the center doesn't sound like a good idea, nor does a ball bearing. Better would be a brass rod and much better would be wood. If you must have a bearing, use nylon.
I'm no rolling pin expert, but simpler has to be better and I would stick to all wood depending on what it was used for. I believe marble is considered essential for some operations.
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Marble, well-cooled, is what you want for rolling pastry dough, so I'm told. Makes it flaky.
I would go wood on wood, given the minimum load. Matter of fact, I do on the ones I make. I capture the handle, bored lengthwise (counterbored to avoid pinch) on a glued-to-the-body wooden pin. If you wanted to go jazzier, I suppose something like a stainless lag would do the job, or perhaps a coarse threaded stainless carriage bolt.
Brass and the extractives in darker woods might make for green pie crust.
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Most of the high end pins these days have bearings in them. Case in point: http://www.creativecookware.com/rolling_pins.htm
That being said, I'm certainly not averse to making them without the bearings. And because they are "high end" certainly doesn't mean they are better!!!! I'm just not sure I have the time to make the pins, make the handles, AND make the "keepers" so to speak (rivet looking pin to hold the handle on) all before Christmas. I may have to get started now! Cheers, cc
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

$30 for a 2" x 20" piece of dowel?? I'm gonna have to fire up the lathe.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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third one down on that page, but with the ends tapered a little and rounded, looks like the one my grandfather made for my mother and that she prefers over all others to this day.
she's an accomplished chef, was a professional for a number of years...
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On Sun, 16 Oct 2005 22:17:06 -0600, "James \"Cubby\" Culbertson"

what hobbies are about, right?
Would these yo-yo bearings work?? http://www.pennstateind.com/store/pkyoyo.html
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

Go to a bearing supply house and buy sealed cartridge bearings. You can get them in variety of interior/exterior diameters, as well as different quality grades.
Note: you want "sealed", not "shielded". The latter is not as resistant to water. Even with the sealed ones, you wouldn't want to leave them soaking for long periods.
Chris
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Try inline skate bearings.
Go to any skateshop (or sporting goods store that sells/repairs them) the will ususally give them away (the used ones that is) for free. The work fine - I used them on a few shop tools I made for my latheand they work great.

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For rolling pins, probably just a piece of nylon tube with an ID approx the same as the od of the steel rod, I frankly would avoid anything other than sealed bearings if you must use ball bearings, as non-sealed will likely 'gunk up' quickly in actual kitchen use and be a real pain to have to replace over and over again.
Another thought would be to let the HANDLES do the spinning, and use nylon washers or some such
John
On Sun, 16 Oct 2005 22:17:06 -0600, "James \"Cubby\" Culbertson"

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On Tue, 18 Oct 2005 13:02:38 -0500, john wrote:

Mechanically, that would work great. I wonder, though, if it would affect the cook's "feel" for the dough. Think "differential" and "ice." The tapered no-handle version a previous poster mentioned would be a limited-slip differential 4x4 in this strained metaphor.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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That tapered pastry rolling pin is a bit lightweight for some jobs. It's for delicate work, not perogi dough. That's where the heavy artillery comes to bear.
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And nothing but a water glass to cut the dough. No metal cookie cutter things, etc.
--

-Mike-
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On Sun, 16 Oct 2005 22:17:06 -0600, "James \"Cubby\" Culbertson"

Sorry I don't have a source suggestion. But, I have made several rolling pins--all one solid piece. Moving parts creates nooks and cranny's where flour/food can collect, become rancid, and difficult to clean. Making it one piece eliminates drilling the perfectly-centered long hole.
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I like good bearings in a rolling pin it takes less effort to use it. I would just countersink them in a 1" and they will not get anything but flour on them. using sealed bearings would be fine. Knight-Toolworks http://www.knight-toolworks.com affordable handmade wooden planes
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Thanks Steve. Any ideas where I might find these sealed bearings? Cheers, cc
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you can get them locally at any bearing shop. they are petty cheap. www.mscdirect.com or mcmaster will have them. you just need to know the inside and outside size you need. width in your case is not critical. they may cost you 4.00 each. Knight-Toolworks http://www.knight-toolworks.com affordable handmade wooden planes
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