Ripping w/o table saw

Lacking a table saw, I have managed to do most of my work with a hand saw, saber saw and a circular saw.
My current project is a small table. For the legs, I have purchased a piece of White Oak 36" x 4-1/2" x 1-1/2"
I want to rip this to obtain (2) 1-1/2" x 1=1/2" lengths, which I shall later crosscut in the middle to make the four legs.
My question is the best way to hold this to eliminate any possibility of a section breaking off near the end of the cut, as might happen if it were clamped to one or two saw horses.
One idea is to set the circular saw for a depth of say 1-1/4" with the piece clamped by the ends and make the two full length cuts. Then, I could take it off of the clamps and finish the cuts with a hand Ryoba saw. Does this sound feasable, or is there a better way to get an accurate rip?
Thanks,
Godzilla
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fasten the board to a white pine 1x6 with dry wall screws. You can make a rip fence or cut by eye. Its easy to make an accurate cut when the stock can not move. >.
Roger Poplin dba snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Godzilla wrote:

Cut it over scrap, the full length supported by the scrap and let the blade go about 1/4" into the scrap. This is also the best way I have found to cut sheet goods with a circular saw. You just lay 2x4's out on the saw horses and throw the OSB/ply on top of them. It's a lot safer than trying to catch the piece as you're cutting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.