best gloves to protect against table saw?

What gloves give the best protection (against losing a finger) when working with a table saw?
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Don't even think about it. Gloves will cause more danger than they can protect you from. Any decent table saw would shread a glove AND rip your finger off. Use the guards the saw came with and use a good purpose built push stick. If you are working with small pieces make/buy a sled with a work clamp so you can stay a safe distance from the blade. This can be as simple as a piece of plywood with a track on the bottom that rides in the groove on the table and some guides you temporarily screw to the plywood. Then you are pushing the sled that is holding the workpiece. That is really the way to go when you are making several pieces alike. It saves time, increases precision and saves fingers
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If you are worried dont use the saw , gloves wont help
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replying to Greg, Otilio guerra wrote: Cargill Meat Plant have metal gloves (Wizard of the Oz Tin Mans hand) and a long wrist band (that are long and almost reach the elbows). No garauntee but it's still better than nothing.
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On Saturday, February 11, 2017 at 10:44:08 PM UTC-5, Otilio guerra wrote:

Metal gloves may be better than nothing as long as your "nothing" includes disregarding all standard safety techniques.
Proper technique and undivided attention kicks butt over any type of gloves.
It may have been mentioned before, but if someone is so afraid of their table saw, then perhaps they should consider a Saw Stop or Bosch Reaxx. Both saws have a sensing system that drops the blade below the table when it comes in contact with flesh. It's a moisture sensing system.
I don't think you can buy a Reaxx in the US right now due to patent claims by Saw Stop but I'm not sure if it's a current ban or a soon-to-be ban.
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Is this a joke?

working
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I think everybody answered your question but let me add something. No gloves, watches, rings, long sleeves or ANYTHING that may get snagged on the blade. I was a cabinet maker for over 10 years and had seen a lot of fingers fly due to all that stuff.
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Not to minimize the danger of tangling directly with the blade but I have sustained more injuries from kickback on a table saw than any that shed any blood. I have seen many from trying to rip too large a stock, dull blades and fence mis-alignment with the blade. An upside is that after breaking my finger many years in a TS accident I now have a legitimate excuse for not being able to get my wedding ring on (not that I object to my marriage but rather have a dislike of wearing rings).
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From personal experience, NO GLOVES! Thirty two years ago I got my gloved left hand yanked into a table saw blade. It happened in the blink of an eye. Fortunately I didn't lose the index finger, but it's mangled. If you're afraid of the saw, don't use it.
peter wrote:

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peter wrote:

the kind that don't let you turn on the power to the blade? ;)
I think what people are getting at is that if your finger gets nicked in the saw, it's likely to just get cut. if a glove gets nicked, it is likely to get pulled into the blade, bringing your hand along for the ride.
--
be safe.
flip
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working
Use and type glove you want. Just have someone else's hand in it and you will be safe......
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That is a good one. Since I just purchased a table saw I squirmed just reading theses posts. I always used push sticks and am damn respectful of what that machinery can do. I am the type that visions the worst (something kicking back into my face, hand going across blade) and make sure I never get too casual while cutting. I do sometimes use surgical gloves to get a better grip on the push sticks which I guess is also a no-no from reading here. Is there such a thing as a foot button to be able to turn the saw off after a cut instead of having to reach down? I guess safety issues would rise from that also.
wrote

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The book "Table Saw Magic" by Jim Tolpin includes plans for making a paddle that you bump with your knee to shut the saw off. I think there is a similar device described in "The Table Saw Book" by Kelly Mehler. One or both should be available through your local library.
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Gloves will _increase_ the hazard (of snagging and being dragged into the blade). Even chain mail gloves won't help much (if at all).
Invest in push sticks/blocks, and make sure that the saw's safety equipment (splitter, guards, etc) is properly installed and used.
If you have the money and are that paranoid, replace the saw with a "Saw-stop" saw. These have "meat detection" and extremely fast blade braking.
See: http://www.sawstop.com/home.htm under "How it works".
[The Sawstop technology has been covered in the woodworking press going back a couple years, and is for real.]
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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None. Standard safety recommendations are to avoid wearing gloves around moving machinery.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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its time for LETTERMAN!!!! he swoops down out of the sky and removes the G from GLOVE leaving only the word LOVE!!!
you dont need a glove, you just need to respect the saw. one good way to do this is to actually read some books on how to safely use a table saw.
randy

working
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peter wrote:

You keep hands, sleeves, jewelry and hair away from machines.
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scribbled this interesting note:

Or you could look into one of these devices: http://www.sawstop.com/howworks.htm
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Gloves are not a good idea. Use your head and a blade guard, always.

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peter wrote:

None! Anything on your hand or finger is a danger. Don't wear gloves and don't wear rings. If you are really careful you won't wear watches. Anything that you put on your hand has a danger of pulling your hand into the saw if it touches the saw.
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