Ridgid table saw

I am currently looking and trying to make up my mind as to which table saw to purchase to replace my aging one. Right now I am looking at the Ridgid with the cast iron top. I have read the reviews that I could find and they looked good. Not many bad comments. Anyone have any comments about the Ridgid? I going to look at one tomorrow and would like to know what to look for when I inspect it.
Thanks, Paul T.
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PHT wrote:

added a Rockler router table to it. It is a great/affordable saw. I'm in the process of adding dust collection to the blade guard as the under table shroud doesn't stop it from spitting sawdust at me (as most TS do).
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Doug Winterburn wrote:

I have the same problem with dust. What are you adding in the way of a table shroud?
Deb
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Dr. Deb wrote:

blade guard. I then epoxied a PVC coupler that fits a small shop vac hose into the hole. That didn't entirely eliminate the spitting, so I'm goig to cut a strip of lexan and epoxy it between the front flanges of the guard. I also made a manifold for the trash can cyclone that lets me hook up a 2.5" and 1.25" shop vac hose for the under blade shroud and the over blade guard. The inlet to the trash can is a 4" hose to a small DC. I'll post a pic in a.b.p.w when it's done and working - hopefully.
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If the lower collection isn't working well, then check your blade/ fence alignment. If the fence is parallel you are cutting at the front of the blade and the dust goes down (if the dust collection is not on it then some of it comes back up again at the back). If the fence is not parallel you are cutting at the back/top of the blade and the dust goes up and at you. I only have the collection at the bottom and I don't get dust flying at me, unless the kerf closes up, in which case it's like a kickback early warning system.
I also added a piece of cardboard on the side of the dust shroud, where it's lower to allow the blade to tilt. When I need to tilt the blade I just pull out the whole removable side of the shroud, I don't do many angled cuts and I have to switch out the zero clearance insert anyway so it's open to get in there anyway. I still get a lot of sawdust on the floor, but it's better.
-Kevin
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PHT wrote:

It's the best of the inexpensive saws. The next step would be the Sears 22124, then the 3 HP cabinet saws. Figure in a better blade--the one that comes with it cuts fast enough but it flexes enough that I don't always get square cuts.
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Sure, don't forget to put the metal foot braces on the bottom before you assemble everything and upright it. You'll never want to lift it up and mess with the feet just to put them on.
Where I have trouble is getting the splitter lined up exactly behind the blade. So, the splitter tends to catch the wood, making a situation more dangerous than no splitter/blade guard assembly at all.
The other trick is getting the motor belt tension right. I don't know that the manual specifies it, or even tells you how to set it up in the instructions.
That said, it's an excellent saw. Everything's smooth, and the fence is decent. When you turn the saw on, you can continue your conversation with someone, or give instructions to your helper without shouting.
Key features: Herc-u-lift system Adjustable on/off switch Belt drive Blade change uses two wrenches, so you need only touch the blade when you're taking it off the arbor. Fence and miter gauge storage on the sides
Plus it qualifies for 6 months no interest on HD credit card. (If you're interested in that sort of thing.)
Puckdropper
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I've had this saw for maybe four years now and I like it. I bought it to replace a Dewalt 744 benchtop saw. I have a very small shop so I like the built in caster system. The saw seems to stay in alignment quite nicely. About a year ago I upgraded to a Forrest WWII blade and am glad I did. Before the Forrest blade I'd been using Freud combination blades which aren't bad but the Forrest takes the prize for clean cuts and smooth operation. I use the 2 1/2" dust port underneath connected with an adaptor to my 4" dust collection hose and it does an OK job for what gets sucked down. I would eventually like to have an overarm blade guard with dust collection but the budget doesn't allow it now. I also have a Freud stacked dado set that I occasionally use on this saw. I make my own inserts- zero clearance as well as different widths for using the dado blades. This saw has handled everything I've thrown at it up to 12/4 oak with no problem. I do switch to a ripping blade if I'm going to do extensive ripping of thick hardwood stock, but for most operations I just use the WWII. I also bought a Freud blade to cut melamine, which I used when I built the cabinets for our kitchen about two or three years ago. When dealing with large sheet goods I usually rough cut them to size using a circular saw first and then to final dimensions on the table saw, using roller stands when necessary. I also built a crosscut sled to handle crosscuts on stock up to 12" wide. Hope this information helps.
Dale

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On Fri, 09 Jan 2009 08:42:50 -0800, dale martin wrote:

FWIW, I'd also been using the Freud combo blade and two Freud thin kerf blades for special rips and crosscuts. Good blades, but nothing exceptional. A couple of months ago I bought the new Freud Fusion blade. What a difference! I saw somewhere that the Fusion was in the samne class as the WWII and I believe it. Even does good in plywood.
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Had one for a year or so now, but only used it sparingly.. I shopped around for months and read all the reviews and it's a LOT of saw for the money..
My only problems with it have been operator error, having used a Shopsmith as a TS for years... The saw is quiet, very accurate and easy to do repeatable cuts on, with the micro-adjuster on the fence.. I'm not a purist or heavy duty user, so thought I'm very impressed with both the saw and the fence, take my verbiage with a grain of salt...
Oh.. If you do buy it, follow Puckdropper's advice about the feet AND use locktite on the Hurculift bracket assembly bolts.. DAMHIKT
mac
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mac davis wrote:

I'll third that.

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There are already a number of good responses so I'll only add some points that haven't been mentioned. I have had a Ridgid saw for several years and recommend it as one of the best saw for a moderate price.
The cast iron top is pretty good, but be sure to put some protection on it if there is any humidity where you work.
The Hercu-lift is surprisingly good. While assembling it, I thought it was a kludge that work never work. But it works GREAT! Very convenient for moving the saw around.
I converted the motor to 220V and am pleased with the result. It seems to start smoother and run quieter.
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Just one last one thing. Check the newest of the Ridgid saws, the 3660. They have moved the saw inboard (think hybrid saw) and the table is now granite! I believe it's slightly smaller - not an issue, actually. Go to the Ridgid forums here: http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f 
and a simple search inquiry, 3660, will give you the high points of the new saw. Incidently, I'm 3.5 years into mine and the only things that I'd change are the outboard motor and a riving knife instead of the splitter. Having weighed all things I still chose this saw and I don't regret it at all. Oh yea, you will find all sorts of saw improvements like dust collection, improved leg stabililty, attached outfeed table, attached router table and much more. A good group of ww'ers.
Have fun! Chuck
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C & E wrote:

Uh, that's the R4511 you're thinking of. The 3660 is pretty much a 3550 repackaged in a single box so the rails don't get separated.
The 4511, on paper anyway, looks to be setting a new standard for price/performance.
I am sorely tempted to sell my 3660 and get one of those.
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DOH!!! Sorry 'bout that, and thanks for the clarification, John. Here's a thread link for it http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t !249&highlight=granite
I know that Paul already bought the 3650 but I like to correct my mistakes for future searchers. Thanks again, John.
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