Review: NYW on DIY

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Well, I DVRed the inaugural offering of The New Yankee Workshop on DIY this morning (Jigs, Part One) and just finished watching it. I think I'm going to be sick.
Most of you know that I've put a fair amount of time into chronicling the tools Norm has used in 19 years of TNYW. That has entailed watching (and timing) a lot of TNYW episodes (243, so far). I didn't start video taping episodes until around 1999--ten years into the show--so I had to rely on HGTV rebroadcasts for all of the early years.
As I viewed all of the episodes I learned that while the original PBS content totalled 24 minutes and 18 seconds (I'm not sure why the odd number, but it's been consistent over roughly eight years of actual PBS content that I have), HGTV edited their airings down to 21 minutes and 45 seconds--also consistent over twelve years worth of programming, or 156 episodes (all that HGTV ever aired). I had an overlap of a few episodes in the late '90s for which I had both PBS and HGTV versions and it was interesting to see what they cut out--it wasn't a lot, mostly setups and an occasional orientation shot--but generally not a lot of meat. Of course I can't really say how much had been cut from the earlier years because I had no comparison recordings.
This morning marked the return of supplemental (to PBS) airings of TNYW since HGTV ended their contract several years ago. I eagerly anticipated it, since I've been transferring all of my VHS recordings over to DVD. Although the VCR tapes were done from fresh, SP recordings of either original PBS broadcasts or HGTV broadcasts of the earlier years, I had to re-record them in EP in order to get all 13 episodes of a season onto a single two hour tape. Consequently, there's a lot of noise (and jitter, due to different VCR machines involved) on my archive tapes. I was hoping to be able to get pristine transfers from my DVR to the DVDs with the new DIY offering. Here's what happened:
The DIY version (at least for this first program) totalled 19 minutes and 43 seconds of content. That's 4½ minutes out of the original 24+ minutes. I don't think it possible to find enough non-critical material to take out of a 24½ program to get to where DIY apprently feels they need to be, but I thought I'd at least check against the PBS version I have. So I pulled out my archive and watched. Quelle horror! Sure, there were a couple of minor cuts that I noticed at first, but after building the panel cutter, panel raising jig, and circle cutting jig, they stopped. They cut out one of the items entirely--the finger boards. I was shocked enough when I looked at my stopwatch on the first viewing and saw 19:43, but as I viewed the original and found one fourth of the projects missing I was simply stunned.
I think I'm going to be sick. I know I said that already. I don't think I can say it too much. If that's the standard to which DIY is going to air TNYW episodes, I'll recommend you not bother to watch. In order to make that number, there will simply have to be significant content excised which will render the program virtually useless. And I'm stuck with putting my noisy, jittery, EP recordings onto DVD. Or, I can buy 200+ episodes from TNYW at $15 a pop...probably not.
What a disappointment.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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SNEEEEEEEP

Perhaps the latest in a very long line of DIY disappointments. I guess the audience that they attract and actually keep has a shorter attention span than the average viewer.
WoodWorks was the only program that I would and or did watch on the DIY channel. I wonder if WoodWorks was originally a 1 hour show? ;~)
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Woodworks was always a challenge to David Marks to show enough detail in the perhaps 18 minutes that was made available to him. Think of all the repeats after the commercial break, to bring the viewer back to the flow, just to send him away 4.3 minutes later.
BTW, he's much better at speaking in complete, well-considered sentences in real life. And I've only met him a couple of brief times.
You should see the stuff that pays the bills!
Patriarch
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 22:38:41 -0500, Patriarch

Think of how much extra time he'd have had if they didn't make him recap what he did 90 seconds before every time they came back from a commercial?
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 00:22:28 GMT, Brian Henderson

Considering the length of the commercial break and the age of most viewers, that recap may be necessary.
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... snip

Wow, that means that one is essentially spending *more* than one out of every three minutes watching commercials.
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On Sat, 17 Mar 2007 21:56:09 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Some of us have TiVO. <G>
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I started taping it and found 51% was commercials. I wish I could get full pay for 49% of my work time. Lou
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C'mon.
I don't believe there's ever been a program anywhere on any channel (infomercials don't count) that's aired more than 1:5 commercial to content. That's 20%.
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LRod

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It's actuallly closer to 30% today ... from answers.com:
<quote>
Advertisements take airtime away from programs. In the 1960s a typical hour-long American show would run for 51 minutes excluding advertisements. Today, a similar program would only be 42 minutes long; a typical 30-minute block of time includes 22 minutes of programming with 6 minutes of national advertising and 2 minutes of local (although some half-hour blocks may have as much as 12 minutes of advertisements).
In other words, over the course of 10 hours, American viewers will see approximately 3 hours of advertisements, twice what they would have seen in the sixties. Furthermore, if that sixties show is rerun today it may be cut by 9 minutes to make room for the extra advertisements. (Some modern showings of Star Trek, for example)
Back in the 1950s and 1960s, the average length of a television advertisement was one minute. As the years passed, the average length shrank to 30 seconds (and often 10 seconds, depending on the television station's purchase of ad time). However, today a majority of advertisements run in 15-second increments (often known as "hooks").
</quote>
When you feel like you're being screwed, you probably are ...
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 10:23:37 -0600, Swingman wrote:

Which is pathetic, because they have more viewership and lower production costs per viewer than ever. They're just pocketing the extra.
Of course, this is all made possible by people who are still willing to watch. So if you don't like it, do what I do--TURN IT OFF!
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 22:22:13 GMT, Steve Hall

Which, unless you're a Neilsen family, is irrelevant because your viewership means nothing at all. They don't know what you're watching, so whether or not you watch it doesn't matter.
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 00:20:49 +0000, Brian Henderson wrote:

If that's true, no one would buy ads.
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 02:22:38 GMT, Steve Hall

People buy ads based on what the Neilsen families are watching, and by extension, what that indicates everyone else is watching. They don't know what non-Neilsen families are watching, hence your actual viewership doesn't matter, they only care about their statistics.
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On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 17:06:11 GMT, Brian Henderson

Remember that other statistics besides Neilsen are now available as cross-checks. Your cable company, Tivo, satellite provider, or other provider all have the ability to gather statistics on what is being watched, and with Tivo, even the number of times it is being rewound and watched. You can bet those statistics are also used to factor advertising charges.
Remember, as far as broadcasters are concerned, TV programs are *not* the product. Viewers are the product.
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wrote:

When talking about statistcs such as the Nielsens and others it should be kept in mind that FIGURES DON'T LIE, BUT LIARS FIGURE Joe G
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I miscalculated the percentage of 1:5, think it was 1 in 5. It's actually 1 in 6. Anyway, the specific percentage doesn't matter--we're certainly in agreement that it's gotten larger.
My principal point, however poorly stated, was that there never has been a 1:1 (50%) ratio of content to commercials in regular programming, and I still maintain that's correct.
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LRod

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commercial. I understand they are using "green-screen" objects in some shows that can have different advertisements/images appear on them, depending on who is funding the show. (Entirely possible, although i don't know if i'm remembering a "this is possible" or a "this is being done")
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flip+@andrew.SeeEmmYou.EeeDeeYou wrote:

Might be possible for boxes, cans, or soda bottles, but for many products the size and shape of the container are part of the branding--those are difficult to green-screen.
Saw this in reverse for an ad for an ISP the other day--numerous laptops ran across the screen, all with the manufacturers' logos carefully blanked.
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flip+@andrew.SeeEmmYou.EeeDeeYou wrote in

In a larger scale example, the Tribune Company did this to Wrigley Field. They put an ugly green board up behind home plate so during the weekend games the big broadcasting networks could sell ads on it.
Puckdropper
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