Refinishing_experience

I refinished a maple end table we bought from Ethan Allen a few years ago. I just did the top because that's were it needed it most. I stripped off all the layers of lacquer and used a dye to match the old stain. Wow! I never knew how awesome this wood grain really was.
I think Ethan Allen used a lacquered glaze with very little stain actually in the wood. It was like layers of 'paint'. You can see the grain MUCH better now. I liked how it turned out so much that I re did another end table already with the same results.
I might do our coffee table next. Or maybe I will wait on that one when the kids are older? :)
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It was a thin paint over perfectly nice cherry. There was no stain or dye at all. It baffles me why they wasted cherry when you can't tell what is under the finish.
I tried to pursuade the customer to let me strip the first piece and then finish both of them properly, but he like the EA. Go figure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ask Norm... he'd know why you'd paint cherry.
:-)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just my opinion here... no panty wadding about the sanctity of cherry, please.
I would think that EA's factories choose cherry for two reasons. 1) Large amounts of affordable, straight consistent grained veneers are available. This ensures consistency of product when manufacturing. 2) The wood is stable, machines, sands and glues well with no exotic tooling. All about manufacturing. If bunga bunga* was appealing and available with the same qualities I am sure they would switch as needed between the two.
*(BTW, bunga bunga was actually invented by me to describe all the mountains of exotic woods that we have now with 42 different names of each species. How the hell do we know FOR SURE exactly what we are getting? I have found that he more exotic the name the more expensive the wood. I think I have all the bunga bunga in my shop ((formerly Curly Eyed Hondurapeen Cocowengaba)), but they may have some at Woodcraft...)
So why do they load the crap on for finish at EA or any of the other furniture peddlars? Easy enough, when you ask the question you usually provide your own answer. The thicker, more opaque the finish is the more easily they can turn out matching pieces in a furniture set. So if the batch of veneers they got several months ago to build tables was a little pink, then it will still match the chairs made in another factory where the cherry was a little brown with almost no pink.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well EA will use secondary woods for lower visibility areas like everybody else. But I'd guess you're essentially right though -- if, for example, the grain/color didn't work out on the pre-finish inspection, only thing left to do is paint it.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most manufacturers use wood that most of us would skip over in their products. Then they use a paint or very thick/dark stain to cover up the inconsistencies in wood grain, color, and quality. Very seldom do you see name brand furniture that clearly shows the grain and has consistent coloring.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.