Recycling a DC?

I am asking $225 for my 2hp (okay it is only 16a, but it could be 2hp) cannister DC on craigslist but am getting no response. Next try would be eBay, but I don't want to go there for an item that can't be shipped. So, I am thinking of recycling it.
Assuming I can get the RPMs worked out, would it be reasonable to use the motor on my 1hp jointer? Would it cut better with the added power?
Use the cannister and lower bag as a filter on a vacuum? Would the added filter area help the suction any?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where are you? Maybe someone here would be interested. Or you could try posting it at WoodNet, Sawmill Creek, or some other woodworking forum with a "Classifieds" section. Sorry I didn't answer your question directly, but I hope this is helpful... Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought we weren't supposed to sell things here, but since you ask; Rochester NY.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

AFAIK, "sellers" are not appreciated, but woodworkers selling their used stuff is cool..
IMHO, folks in the group selling or trading their own stuff isn't spam, just part of woodworking.. YMWV
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wade Lippman wrote:

Isn't the more usual thing to do just be to lower the price? If you can't sell it for $225, maybe $195 might be somebody's sweet spot.
I look at Craig's List pretty much every day. That's the way you unload stuff there... set a price, wait, if it doesn't sell then set a lower price. Eventually you get rid of it.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote in message

Of course you get rid of it eventually, but the motor alone is worth $225; If I can't get that much for it I would rather soup up my jointer and make a better vacuum.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wade Lippman wrote:

How much is your time and aggravation worth while you're converting this into who-knows-what? You need to figure that into the price as well as the value of the DC parts.
Maybe you just enjoy a challenge more than I do.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You could build one bad-ass disc sander... *eg*
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I doubt you'd see much benefit, and if your jointer is anything like mine getting that motor in there and tensioned right was something I only want to experience once. A band saw would probably be a better place for it if you had a 3/4 hp 14" saw.
The easiest thing to do with a spare motor is make a disc sander, though 2 hp is kind of ridiculous for that.
-Leuf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just bought a new 2 HP DC at Harbor Freight for $180.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sure you did. A 8a 2hp motor; another HF miracle breakthrough. And the canvas dust bag is nice too. The only good thing about is that the motor is too feeble to spread the dust very far.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wade Lippman wrote:

Harbor Freight web site lists only one 2HP DC, ITEM 45378-1VGA. Harbor Freight web site lists it at 14 amp at 110V.
The product manual for the unit shows:
Motor 2 HP, 20 AMPS Peak, Single Phase, 60 Hz, 110 Volts
Where did you come up with 8a?
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, I remembered it was a whole lot less than the amperage for any 2hp motor, but didn't recall the exact amount. Okay, 14a not 8a. (And please don't get into the calculations of how many amps go into a hp. For normal motors it is approximately 22a; for expensive high efficiency motors maybe as low as 16a. It is never 14a, and HF does not use expensive high efficiency motors; it is probably a tad more than 1hp. And that assumes it actually draws 14a; an uncertain issue.)
I am selling a canister DC with a real 2hp motor; asking $225. Two people have offered $200; for that price I will scrap it and save the motor in case my TS motor ever calls it quits, since the motor alone sells for $300.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Anybody got any links or something where I can research that? I confess I'm not well-versed in motors as I used to be, but everything I've ever been taught says if it pulls x amps on y number of volts, it's using xy watts and therefore xy(cf) horsepower. How is horsepower measured in this case?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Input vs output...you're right on the input calculations energy used.
To measure actual motor hp requires a dynamometer.
Efficiency is measured as the difference.
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/electrical-motor-efficiency-d_655.html
Much below 75-80% is a pretty inefficient motor for full hp motors. It's possible HF motor might not live up to that, but most of the cheapness ime is from sleeves vs bearings and other mechanical factors more than the power consumed/hp. But, I've not put one on a dynamometer, either, and doubt whoever is doing the bitching has, either... :)
The big problem usually is simply one of nameplate bragging a la a the Craftsman "peak" hp crap...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

740 Watts to the horsepower
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

746 Watts to the horsepower
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That is "input" horsepower; it is like calculating the power of your car engine by determining the power contained in the gasoline it uses. It is not a particularly useful number. Output horsepower is determined by testing the motor and seeing how much work it can do.
Efficient motors (which are, all other things being equal, much more expensive than inefficient motors) will have low input hp relative to their output hp.
HF has either the most efficient 2hp motor on the market, or a crappy 1hp motor and lying about the hp. Which do you think it is?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A 'small horsepower' motor is generally no more than 85% efficient, so 'not everything that goes in, comes out'.
In addition "AC electricity" is "funny". "volts" times "amps" is _not_ the same thing as 'watts'. Things change, depending on the 'power factor' of the circuit -- which describes the phase relationship between voltage and current flow. The relationship for AC is: watts = volts * amps * power-factor A typical motor has a 'power factor' of about 0.67.
Put all that together and you get the following: 1HP output = 746 watts (definition)
= 746 watts / .67 power-factor = 1113.4+ 'volt-amps'
= 1113.4+ volt-amps/.85 efficiency in = 1309.9 volt-amps in
= 1309.9 volt-amps in /120v = 10.916 amps
= 10.916 amp @ 120v input with .67 power-factor, @ 85% efficiency.
That's _awfully_ close to Toller's claimed "11a" per horsepower. <grin>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.