Re: What is it? XL

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222 - A very strange looking set of snap ring pliers?
223 - A "pointing" device used for the cement / mortar between bricks, etc. Possibly used by today's brickface and stucco folks to create false bricks, etc.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. http://www.autodrill.com http://www.multi-spindle-heads.com
V8013
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Crossposted drivel?
Frank
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 04:14:38 GMT, "Frank Ketchum"

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Both of these are correct.
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This one isn't for snap rings.

I don't think this is correct.
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Yes, thanks for the link
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I believe this is correct.
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The Minie ball was neither mini nor a ball. It was invented by a guy named Minie, and looks pretty much like what you have. The base should be hollow.
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Matthew Russotto wrote:

I don't think it's so old as to be US Civil War. In fact, the nose looks quite modern sort of wadcutter, rather than early 20th century. The base looks older. As you say, the base will tell if it's a Minie. For those who don't know, the useful feature of the Minie was that, while it was small enough to pass easily down the barrel when loaded from the muzzle, the hollow base expanded to engage the rifling, or at least seal tightly. Similar looking pistol bullets, without the deep hollow, were also made for cartridge loading. The unusual thing about this one, compared to most older wadcutters, is the straight slope of the bullet and the fact that it's set rather far in from the edge.
--
Gerald Clough
"Nothing has any value, unless you know you can give it up."
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    [ ... ]

    Not sure about a "Maxi" ball, but a "Minnie" (not "mini" ball is named after the inventor. A projectile used in the Civil war era to replace the previous bullets, which were round balls. The term "ball" continued for some time after that, even applying to 38 special revolver cartridges and 45 ACP cartridges during WWII. The Minnie ball (it really needs an accent somewhere which I am not prepared to add) had a hollow base. It was easily slid down on top of the power with the ramrod, and when fired, it expanded to grip the rifling more firmly.
    I had already suggested a bullet with a Minnie ball as a possibility, and the way to tell is to look at the bottom. If it is flat, it was a more recent cast lead bullet. If it has a significant cavity in the base, it is more likely to be a Minnie ball, though I believe that the outer surface is normally smoothly curved, not stepped as this one is.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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It persists today, but refers to fully-jacketed (not hollowpoint or soft nose) ammunition, which the Minie wasn;t.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

I think that "Maxi" is a Thompson Center creation. I think the correct spelling is "Minie", with an accent over the "e". I could post it using extended ASCII, but I don't think that my 8-bit ASCII is the same as everyone else's 8-bit ASCII.
As an aside, is there a UNIX/WENIX/Linux standard for 8-bit ASCII?
R, Tom Q. (from r.c.m)
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Tom Quackenbush wrote: <snip>

WENIX = XENIX.
Although ... Weenie UNIX ?... nah - self redundant. : )
R, Tom Q.
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ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is by definition 7-bit.
The typical 8-bit character set on linux is ISO-8859-1 (Latin) which is based on 7-bit ASCII + a number of western european characters.
Older unix may support 8-bit ascii, but the upper 128 bytes are not standardized between vendors.
scott
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

is controlling other functions typically on electronic equipment.
There is 5 & 6 level codes - Baudot and Trascii. 6 level code was needed for some bit slice machines. Only the 6 level (of the two) has ASCII roots.
Martin [ has used all four ]
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Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

Thanks for the information, Scott & Martin.
I'd never heard of Trascii before - that's interesting.
I have worked with Baudot before, which could also get interesting, especially when the [FIGS] code wasn't recognized, or when the current loop wasn't set to "reverse" (IIRC, "reverse" was normal operation in the US Navy).
R, Tom Q.
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    [ ... ]

    O.K. I knew that the accent was missing, but wasn't sure whether it should be one or two 'n's.

    Sure -- how many do you want? :-)
    The one which I have selected on my Solaris 8 machine is:
        ISO8859-15
but the Solaris 2.6 machines don't go beyond:
        ISO8859-1
and no -- I don't know what the actual difference is. :-)
    There were about twenty to choose from when I installed the OS, and this one is probably the best bet overall. Some of them don't handle American English very well -- being optimized for other languages. And some are totally confusing (the ones which implement the Japanese Kanji for example. :-)
    I haven't really explored which ones my OpenBSD systems offer -- both the ones on Intel CPUs and the ones on Sun SPARCs.
    But, when you don't know what will be reading what you post, plain 7-bit ASCII is the safest. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

Wow - ain't standards great? And so many to choose from!
Thanks for the info.
R, Tom Q.
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Check out these Text files : specs!
http://www.unicode.org/Public/MAPPINGS/ISO8859 /
Martin
Tom Quackenbush wrote:

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Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
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    Thanks!
    So -- there are some differences:
8bit    16bit        8859-1            8859-15 =====================================================================0xA4 0x00A4 # CURRENCY SIGN        EURO SIGN 0xA6 0x00A6 # BROKEN BAR LATIN CAPITAL LETTER S WITH CARON 0xA8 0x00A8 # DIAERESIS            LATIN SMALL LETTER S WITH CARON 0xB4 0x00B4 # ACUTE ACCENT        LATIN CAPITAL LETTER Z WITH CARON 0xB8 0x00B8 # CEDILLA            LATIN SMALL LETTER Z WITH CARON 0xBC 0x00BC # VULGAR FRACTION ONE QUARTER    LATIN CAPITAL LIGATURE OE 0xBD 0x00BD # VULGAR FRACTION ONE HALF        LATIN SMALL LIGATURE OE 0xBE 0x00BE # VULGAR FRACTION THREE QUARTERS    LATIN CAPITAL LETTER Y WITH DIAERESIS 0xD0 0x00D0 # LATIN CAPITAL LETTER The (Icelandic)    LATIN CAPITAL LETTER The 0xDE 0x00DE # LATIN CAPITAL LETTER THORN (Icelandic)    LATIN CAPITAL LETTER THORN 0xDF 0x00DF # LATIN SMALL LETTER SHARP S (German)    LATIN SMALL LETTER SHARP S 0xF0 0x00F0 # LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH (Icelandic)    LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH 0xFE 0x00FE # LATIN SMALL LETTER THORN (Icelandic)    LATIN SMALL LETTER THORN
    Aside from everything from 0x81 through 0x9F being defined as control characters, which is how they are handled on my system. But I see postings from Windows boxen and from Macs which use characters in that range for something or other.
    Merry Christmas         DoN.
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