Re: What is it? CXXII

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On Thu, 06 Jul 2006 08:35:10 -0700, Roger Haar

This is correct. It is called a shoe. Sometimes there is one on both ends of the cutter bar. The one near the pittman arm is the inside shoe and the other is the outside or land shoe.
To early farmers, any dividing of a field was "laying off a land." Laying off a smaller tract was done for a couple of reasons. At the rate of a few acres per day, it might me all a farmer could till before the planting or growing season passed. And, secondly, some progress could be seen in plowing a smaller tract; the psychological benefit of seeing an end to a task.
--Andy Asberry recommends NewsGuy--
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wrote:

Very interesting! Thanks very much. When my wife read this it sparked some childhood memories of her father talking about the shoe on the combine.
Gary (who sent in the photo)
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Rich Grise writes:

I suggest it's 6000 grams, in which case the object is a smallish scale like these:
http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/19393_lg.jpg
http://www.aardvarkclay.com/catalog_pics/scales/spring_scale.jpg
but made with the general layout of this big one
http://www.fuhshyh.com/gif/product-1b.jpg
to allow for a larger dial, which in this case rotates through perhaps 1/4 circle, not a full circle, and has its needle out in the open.
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I'll go ahead and partly answer #711: you are correct, it's the top of the frame of a world globe. I saw three other globes this week and all of them had degrees on both sides of the frame; only the globe in the photo had degrees on one side and different markings on the other. I'll give the answer to why it has the number 6000 on it in a couple days if no one gets it.
Rob
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Miles from equator?
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I'm guessing Russian mils. 6,000 in a circle. Here's a link: http://www.boomershoot.org/general/mils.htm Karl
R.H. wrote:

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Nice link!
Really makes the Minute Of Angle concept much clearer. Thanks.
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Oh, bring back that old continuity.
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Looks like I was wrong but I learned something I didn't know at that site so that was good. Karl
John Husvar wrote:

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|> R.H. wrote: |> 711 looks a lot like the top of that metal semicircle that holds an |> ordinary world globe, but 6000 what? It should be 90 degrees, so |> that's probably not it.
| I'll go ahead and partly answer #711: you are correct, it's the | top of the frame of a world globe. I saw three other globes this week and | all of them had degrees on both sides of the frame; only the globe in the | photo had degrees on one side and different markings on the other. I'll | give the answer to why it has the number 6000 on it in a couple days if no | one gets it.
Could it be the measurement in mils? There're 6400 mils in a circle. What are the other gradients shown? ____________________________Gerard S.
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    Well ... a quarter of the circumference of the world is about 6250 miles, and the scale stops short of the pole, so I would guess that that is the distance from the equator -- or if the globe is one of those designed to be free of an axis, it allows you to measure the great-circle distance between two points which are less than a quarter of the circumference apart -- or by adding the value to the South of the equator, you could cover a distance of nearly 12000 miles great circle distance.
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Part of this answer is close.
Rob
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Using this and the hint that it's used outdoors at a farm or ranch, could this tool be used for installing a barbed wire fence? I'm not sure what the ends would be used for, but the notches on the inside could be used to hold the wire in place with the curve in the tool wrapping around the fencepost. While the tool holds the wire in place, you can secure the wire to the post.
-Eric
R.H. wrote:

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Doesn't look like any fencing pliers or come-along that I used to install barbed wire fencing, but then that was more than 30 years ago, too.
scott
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writes:

I have no idea how old this tool is, there isn't a single letter or number on it that I can see. I'm planning to use the links below on the answer page, the first is a collage of about a hundred different types of barbed wire:
http://www.barbwiremuseum.com/Barbed_wire_collage.htm
This next link gives a few details on some specific types:
http://www.barbwiremuseum.com/barbedwireimages.htm
I'm thinking that with so many different kinds of barbed wire there must also be quite a few different and unusual tools for working with them, so I'll probably go with the barbed wire answer for now until I find evidence that it's something else. I've sent a couple emails to some barbed wire museums, maybe one of them will recognize it.
Rob
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The fencing pliers we used were like 2T-1900 at <http://www.hooverfence.com/tools/fence-pliers.htm
We'd use a block-n-tackle come-along to tension the wire.
scott
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I looked again at what was marked on the other similar tool and it read "barbed wire wrapping tool", I'm guessing that it means wrapping it in coils or on spools.
The answer for number 712: carriage driver's tool, the part on the upper left is a hoof pick and the hex is probably for adjusting a carbide lamp, not sure about the other two parts.
Rob
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Scott wrote:
>We'd use a block-n-tackle come-along to tension the >wire.
God do you bring back memories.
The rope was 3 strand manila and rough as a cob.
Lew
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wrote:

Yep, and making sure that the clamp stayed attached to the wire was a trick. Always had to get the wire hauled a bit tighter than needed because you knew you'd lose some tension between the stretcher and the post onto which you were tying the wire.
Those were even more fun with woven wire fences like hog wire. I made a clamp out of a couple of 1 x 4's to get reasonably even tension among all of the strands.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

With woven wire I'd pull and fasten the top strand first, then work my way down, keeping the strands lined up vertically where I stapled them. That required me to lug a minimum of tools. Then I'd restore tension to all strands by walking along and using two pairs of pliers to tighten the ripples.
Tightening was a leisurely activity. It left a fence so straight that I could I could see from a distance if everything was okay. The ripples allowed stretching if a limb fell on the fence, and the ripples could easily be retightened.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:
> Yep, and making sure that the clamp stayed attached to the wire was a > trick. Always had to get the wire hauled a bit tighter than needed > because >> you knew you'd lose some tension between the stretcher and the post onto > which you were tying the wire. > Those were even more fun with woven wire fences like hog wire.
Ah yes, hog wire, I still remember helping my dad string it.
We had a big old brood sow that could give a fence a good test.
The metal intermediate posts weren't to bad; but, the corners and those locust post.
Ever try to drive a staple into a locust post?
Might as well try driving them into steel.
Lew
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