what is it called?

Hi I am going to be decorating my bathroom soon and while I was measuring the floor to get a size for new flooring I noticed this
http://i1.tinypic.com/sfknxz.jpg
What is the white thing called and will it just be a simple matter of removing the toilet and replacing it.
Thanks Ron
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Its a straight pan connector and it is as simple as taking the pan out pushing on the connector and replacing the pan as long as the pan oulet and the soil pipe are level with each other. It does look like your pan is a little bit lower than the soil pipe so you may need an offset pan connector which will make up for the differing levels

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You might also need a new cistern>pan coupler, they sometimes pack up if disturbed. Also, have a couple of long brass or stainless screws handy 'cos the ones holding the pan to the floor may be rather corroded, depending on how good the aim of small boys in your house has been over the years.
--
Skipweasel
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Guy King wrote:

And several large tubes of silicone rubber rather than the bodge that has been applied with what looks like packing tape.
My experience of toilets is that you have about a 1 in 20 chance of them NOT leaking. Unless you accept this, and use silicon all over every joint in those pathetic pushfit couplers.
Sometimes you get lucky, sometimes you end up more or else making your own coupler out of silicone.
The good news is, that like an erect penis, once sorted they generally stay dry unless you fuck with them.
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ron wrote:

WC pan connector, or commonly known as a Multikwick or Kwickfit IIRC. Yes, it has a rubber seal around the male end which shoves into the grey soil pipe, and another one at the female end to accept the ceramic outlet of the loo.
Available in "straight" or "offset" types (you might be better off with the latter?):
<http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 2642&tst155&id145>
Especially if you're taking out the toilet anyway to sort this problem, make sure you put the floor covering underneath it rather than around it - much better job! NB - this may affect the relative alignment of the outlet and inlets, depending on the thickness of the floor covering.
David
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ron wrote:

It's a straight pan connecter running into a sawn-off piece of solvent weld pipe. You may have trouble removing this, it looks as if gap filling solvent cement has been liberally applied! What a ghastly looking job. Look at the overflow, too! I'm sure you can improve this!
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Chris Bacon wrote:

Don't see what problem is - the white pan connector should pull straight out of the grey solvent-weld pipe, and can be replaced. What's the point of changing the grey pipe, as you seem to be suggesting?
David
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Lobster wrote:

Look carefully at the joints - it looks as though the pan connector has had a drop of solvent filler adhesive applied. ICBW, but look at the top of the soil pipe where the connector is pushed in.
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I think he's thinking the connector's been somehow glued to the pipe. At first glance it does look like that, but on close inspection I reckon what appears to be a ring of solvent-weld gunge is actually the chamfer on the pipe.
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Guy King wrote:

I can't see a chamfer on the pipe, it looks as if it's just been sawn off straight. The gunk at the top could be - erm - well - just some sort of gunk, I suppose. The OP will find out sometime.
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I reckon the gunk at the top is a chamfer.
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Yes, my new toilet cistern comes with a syphonless flap valve. Looks much simpler and requires no ugly overflow pipe (it goes straight down the bowl).
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

The "internal overflow" is available on cisterns with siphons as well as any other sort. The flap valve is a crap idea that should be consigned to the dustbin.
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says...

Yes agreed - what are they called as I need yet another replacement rubber seal for my "drop stop", no syphon flush
--
John

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John Weston wrote:

Sorry, I don't know. Nonseals? I was apalled to go somewhere a while ago abroad, where these things were in general use.The buggers leak. Our pinnacle of flush technology was unheard of. In this place, mains pressure was only available about 15 hours a day (and only where it was specially installed - some people did not have it). They had to "save water" in jugs, etc - not ideal in a place like that - if loads hadn't escaped from these flaming poxy things, I bet that the problem would have been alleviated. They really should be scrapped. We complain about water company pipe leaks, & install these things! Money I s'pose.
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I hadn't realised they were that bad. I've never had one before, but this one came with it. I might pop in a compact standard one before I fit the cistern then. In the past I've always fitted those two part syphons that could be disassembled without removing the cistern from the toilet.
Christian.
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