RE: Pepper Mills

Most pepper mills, IMHO, are a day late and a dollar short.
They jam up, don't hold regristation, and in general, a total PITA.
Several years ago, found a Japanese unit, with ceramic cutters, on the close out table of a liquidator.
Beautiful piece of equipment.
Have never been able to find another one.
Am considering building a couple of pepper mills, IF I can find good ceramic cutters.
Both WoodCraft and Rockler have this unit:
http://tinyurl.com/yz5ofv9
Anybody have any experience with this or other ceramic cutters?
Lew
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Many other suppliers such as Packard and Craft Supplies also have these ceramic crush grind mills. I just turned one and have been using it for about 2 months, so far no complaints. It works very smoothly and produces a very nice grind of pepper. Mounting these mills is a bit tricky but once you figure it out, no big deal. Russ

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"Russ Stanton" wrote:

----------------------------------- Thank you for the links.
Looks like everybody is selling the same unit.
Glad to see you're having good results.
Lew
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I have to agree with your assessment to some extent. I tool a class at Woodcraft and apparently there a several grades of internal parts. If the ones you do not like are those that you have seen at the store and look similar to the parts in the kits sold at Woodcraft, reconsider. The one I made gets used daily and so far seems to work as well today as it did when I made it. The kit I used is not "pot metal" or stamped steel, my kit has stainless steel grinder parts.
Considering the ceramic sets, I have seen the plans to turn them and stepped back from the kit. The instructors at Woodcraft were not even sure how to turn these type grinders although they sold the kits. I have seen articles on the subject of turning mills for the ceramic kits and it involves some pretty advanced wood turning techniques and or tools.
The standard mills are complicated enough IMHO.
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Actually the truning is no more difficult than any other mill with exception of needing to cut a relief inside the barrel of the mill . I found that using a Sorby relief cutter that is part of their thread chasing system works perfectly http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code 6534&Category_Code=tools-srby-spec-threadcut
The remaining part of the inside is just drilling with several sizes of Forstners bits, turn the outside to shape.
Russ

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[...snip...]

FYI, the Woodcraft web site has instructions for how to prepare and install.
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FIY I mentioned that I have seen the plans in the first sentence. It is still a more advanced procedure and requires a more specialized tool for the inner hidden cuts.
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Best mechanisms are by Kyocera (Kyoto ceramic), and anything ceramic is probably going to be OK.
Peugeot are pretty good (yes, they did makes cars & bikes, but that was 100 years ago)
As to using one in the kitchen, I have a couple of pestles & mortars. I use those far more than a rotary grinder. They'll also do fenugreek and lemongrass.
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