Re: Changing the Belts on a Drill Press

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hmmm... You wrote "I unloosened THE BOLT". If your Delta is like mine there are TWO screws to loosen--one on each side of the unit.
dave
Thomas Mitchell wrote:

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Yep I found that when I went back out, but it was ALREADY loose. After a little effort I was able to take the belt from the pulley to the motor off which must have been the key because the middle pulley was then free to flop about and the second belt came right off. I was trying to get the first belt off and a little frustrated after trying for about 20 minutes. When I get like that I get out of the shop for my own safety and usually come in and read/reply to posts.
I have the press set at 3000rpm and the top vibrates merciouslessly. I tried putting a little duct tape on the housing to make a better fit for the top which dampened the noise some, but not nearly enough. Do you see the same behavior with your Delta?
Thomas
Bay Area Dave wrote:

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A number of these plastic-topped drill pressess have this problem. I found when I first got my drill home it made an awful racket that would stop if I put my hand on the top. If that's your situation, the two suggestions I've seen are to replace the belts with link belts, which soak up vibration, or to line the plastic case's seams with weather stripping.
Another thing to look at is a lot of the low-end drill presses ship with *awful* chucks. The one that came with mine (Detla 17-965) wasn't well balanced and caused a lot of vibration. As soon as I replaced it with a nice Jacobs chuck the whole experience improved imeasurably. If memory serves I paid about $100 for the new chuck, but thanks to reading RW I was prepared to do it when I bought the drill press, so my expectation was to spend $350 for the press plus $100 for the chuck; I wasn't dissapointed to discover I was spending $350 for a drill press that came with a paperweight shaped like a chuck.
Dunno why you're having so much trouble with the belt tension. My proceedure is to losen the set screw on each side, and pull the handle on the right side forward. That moves the motor (and the rear spindle) forward. Then, slip one end of the rear belt to a slacker position. Once there is just a little bit of slack in the system, the middle spindle can be moved about a bit to provide slack for the other belt.
-BAT
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Yep that's it. Good idea about the weather stripping. I use the same idea on the back of toilet tank lids so that they don't clank into the wall. I'll give it a try.

I'll add a new chuck to the list. I've seen the link belts and think they are neat but a better chuck is likely the better investment. I did notice that when I set the RPM to 3000 last night that everything was bouncing off the table.

I made sure the motor was loose but then tried removing the front belt. Didn't think about the rear belt. Doh. I went out last night and after fighting for another few minutes thought of trying the rear belt. It slipped off fairly easy. I think part of the issue was that the belts were both on the largest position so there wasn't any slack to speak of. The motor didn't really move forward in that position. I could use the push the handle and add tension to the belt, but the motor was tight up against the housing when the handle was released. So I think the biggest issue is that I was trying to remove the front belt first. First time I played around with the belts on the delta. Who writes these manuals anyway?
Thomas
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again, guess I was lucky. My same DP has NO runout OR vibration, and the chuck works smoothly and holds all size drills tightly. (now don't get me started on the POS Delta BS that I ended up returning to the dealer due to unsolvable vibration...)
d ave
"Brett A. Thomas" wrote:

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If you say it has no runout, that just means you can't measure accurately enough.
wrote in message

for
see
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Now you are going off into the theoretical realm. I just KNEW someone was going to bring that up. Try to be more practical, and not quite so anal about this stuff.
dave
CW wrote:

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I am. I am also a machinist. Try to be more precise. Should I take your comments to mean that woodworkers are imprecise hacks and I should view it in that context? When you emphasize "NO runout", I take that as more than eyeballing it.
Try to be more practical,
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Brett A. Thomas wrote:

PLASTIC? On a Delta floor model DP? Gack.
I didn't look at the Deltas that closely when I was shopping. I don't actually remember just what I found wrong with them, but it might have just come down to the big price difference. I didn't notice any plastic.
I went back to Sears with some trepidation, and bought the 15" Crapsman. As luck would have it, I paid full price for the damn thing, and then learned that it's one of those items that's almost always on sale, and I had caught it during a brief period between sales.
I had some trouble with the little ring flummy at the top of the column getting chewed up, and the table rack mechanism still isn't as smooth as I'd like it to be, but otherwise I love the DP. The head is all cast iron and steel except for some cheap screw-on bits like the chuck key holder. The lid is a big piece of stamped sheet metal that goes *WHANG* when I slam it down.
The T-slot table made it impossible to use my two-axis vise, so I cobbled up a crazy contraption out of angle iron and scrap pieces of steel plate cut off something or other so I could mount it on the table. I need to get that machined so that it's perfectly flat some day, though it's close enough for my purposes already.
Um. Sorry. I know this is completely irrelevant to the discussion at hand. I'm just sitting here dreamily thinking about how much I'm in love with my drill press. I wish I had two or three of them, so I could do fewer setup changes. I absolutely use the hell out of a drill press.
The Jacobs chuck on it (out of the box) is very good too. I haven't tested it with a runout gauge or anything that extreme, but by eyeball that sucker runs perfectly true. It's light years ahead of the chuck on the DP this one replaced.
Maybe Crapsman isn't such a bad deal after all. It was $300, BTW.
@@@@@@@@ @@@ @@@ @@ @@@@@ @@@@@ @@ @@@@@@@@@ @@ @@@@@@@ MY DRILL PRESS @@ @@@@@ @@ @@@ @@@@@@@@@ @
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you're very strange
i hope you don't find any strange ways to test the runout of your lover
ick

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Mike in Mystic wrote:

Well, I'm glad you're trying not to hurt my feelings or anything...
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Sounds like you have the same problem I had when I brought mine home 8 years ago. The belts weren't correct. Mine was assembled at the store and they had one belt the correct size and the other and inch or so smaller than it was supposed to be. Once I replaced it with the right size, there was plently of slack to move the belts when the motor was loose.
As for the vibration, I had some, but it was always when the dp had been unused for a while. Which meant the belts where taking a set. Once the dp ran for a while, the belts would heat up and relax and it would run smoother. So a couple of years ago I finally replaced the v-belts with link belts and now it runs smoothly all the time.
-- Rusty Myers Austin, TX

housing.
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Well with that being the second recommendation for link belts so far, I'll have to check them out, which I did, and have to laugh at Lee Valley as they call the product Link Belt for Contactor Saws and picture it with a drill press, but I digress. I'll have to get a few for the drill press and see how much vibration it gets rid of.
Thomas
Rusty Myers wrote:

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Sort of makes one wonder WHY the industry doesn't change to the link belts.
Dave wrote:

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belts.
Cost
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Link belts are as cheap to make as solid belts. They are more so in as far multiple sizes do not need to be stocked. They are used often in industry in there intended roll. Emergency repair. They were never intended for long term service nor do they have the strength or long term durability of a standard belt. In light weight, intermittent duty hobby equipment they work fine but they will not hold up under heavy duty.

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Bother... I hate to ask, but how do you check for run out on the drill press. I used my engineer square to make sure that the bit was at 90 degrees to the table, but there's something else? Google Drill Press here I come.
Thomas
Bay Area Dave wrote:

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Thomas,
See the other quite lengthy article I wrote on all the machinists' tools you need. :) This is where the dial indicator and magentic base comes in. You use the magnetic base to lock the dial caliper to the table and measure the runout.
I understand straight-cut router bits are made to higher tolerances (and bend less easily) than drill bits for what you measure.
-BAT
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also, you can just install a bit that you know is straight, turn the thing on a low speed and check visually for runout. If you can't see ANY lateral movement, you are good to go. Don't worry about some infinitesmal deviation. It isn't gonna matter when drilling...
Also, pull on the chuck from various sides, to see if it has any play. There's an adjustment for the quill, but I forget if it is on the left or right... (The quill holds the chuck.)
dave
Thomas Mitchell wrote:

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AND, there is a lever that you have to move towards the front of the drill press, which moves the pulleys together and slackens the belts.

housing.
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