RAISED PANEL BIT QUESTION


I am presently using a vertical raised panel bit to do some small jobs but have taken on redoing my kitchen. Was looking at getting the new frued 2+2 raised panel cutter but would like to konw if you can make a cut in one pass with this type of bit or do you have to adjust the fence two or three times to take small cuts. I am using a Frued 3-1/4 HP variable speed router so I should be OK in the Power department but would really like to know if the extra money for the bigger bit is really worth the expence and will it save any time.
Regards
Bill
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Bill,
I've never used the bits to make mini-panel, but I have to think it would be safer and less wear on the bit if you make multiple passes.
I have a stack of 1/4" boards that I spring clamp to the infeed and outfeed side of my fence. After each pass, I simply remove one of the boards from each side, thus cutting a 1/4" deeper into the panel. Its very simple and very quick.
Would love to take credit for the idea, but its directly from one of Pat Warner's books or a page on his website, I can't remember which.
Chuck
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Bill,
Woodchuck's reference to Pat Warner and his site www.patwarner.com is a good place to learn. The idea of using the 1/4" boards in front of the fence works great. Also consider that when routing across the grain you need to take lighter cuts or you will get tearout. I have several sets of the Freud raised panel bits and they have been excellent.
I made the router fence that Pat shows on his site and use a Rout-R-Lift so height and depth of cut are micro-adjustable. I tend to take lighter cuts to avoid tearout so I can't really tell you if you'll save time over using a vertical bit. Depending on your fence, technique and several other factors, I'd say the Freud bit is probably easier to use and perhaps even safer since everything is on a nice flat surface and not being held vertically.
Bob S.

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to
factors,
since
A couple of questions if I may ask about using a vertical bit.
How high a fence are you using? Did you have to adjust the height of the fence the first few times you used a vertical panel bit?
Did you first use a regular flat panel bit and then go to the vertical bit? What prompted you to do so?
Doing the best cut you can with both bits, what if any differences do you notice between the vertical and flat panel bits, either the way they cut or the finish achieved?
Thanks
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Upscale,
You posted your questions to the OP under my post - he may not see them.
Bob S.
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Yes I know, but you did say you were using vertical panel bits. Most if not all of the questions would apply to you as well as anyone else that uses vertical panel bits.
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Upscale,
Think I may have not been clear. I use the Freud horizontal (flat) type bits for making my raised panels - not the vertical type bits. My only experience with using a vertical panel bit was a disaster. I did not have a good fence and wasn't able to keep the panel perpendicular to the table. That is what prompted me to build a better fence (i.e. Pat Warner's design). Although I haven't made a taller fence, it can be made to any (reasonable) height and fastened to the rest of the fence - it's designed to be replaceable. After building the fence - there was a big sale on Freud bits and that's when I got the raised panel set and never bothered with a vertical bit again.
Sorry if my post misled you to thinking I might have known what I was doing.........;-)
Bob S.
wrote in message news:1hNge.27164

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Build your table base up with several pieces of 1/4" ply. Make a pass and remove a sheet. You can make the cut in one pass but that's hard on the cutters and the router.
The Freud 2+2 is excellent.
William Falconer wrote:

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On Thu, 12 May 2005 13:25:38 GMT, "William Falconer"

Contrary to the advice of others I've been making single-pass cuts in red oak and ash for years with no problems. Jesada bits, instead of Freud but no undue wear.
In denser woods, like maple, or woods prone to burn, like cherry, multiple passes would probably be a good idea, and the 1/4" pieces stacked against the fence, to be removed one by one, makes it about as painless as its gonna get.
Testing with a piece of scrap will answer all your questions in very short order.
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