Questions about Mortisers

I just received a Delta 14-651 Mortiser and I am wondering about the setup of the auger bit to the chisel housing. The manual indicates that bit extend past the sharp portion of the chisel anywhere from 1/16" to 3/16" "depending on the type of wood" one is working with. If one is working with a softer wood does the bit extend more or less and the reciprocal then hold true for harder wood? Or does this distance vary according to the properties of individual woods (e.g. does cherry behave differently than soft maple?).
In just playing with the machine for short time, it also seems that its efficiency is directly related to how well the auger bits pull up the chips and expels them from the chisel housing. The chips seem to have a tendency to really jam up everything. Is there anything (waxes or whatever) that could be applied to the auger that might move the chips better. I suspect that one could also goof up the glue joint if it were contaminated with wax or a lubricant.
Thanks in advance for your responses.
TEF
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hi tom,
i have the same mortiser. first of all, i suggest you purchase the mortise chisel cone sharpener from lee valley, use it, and then hone the chisel sides to ensure that they are sharp. to set the bit, i use a nickel. seems to provide the right amount of space.
also, i made a fence face with a bevel at the bottom to allow dust/chips a place to go. works pretty well.
good luck!
--- dz
TEF wrote:

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TEF wrote:

The distance between the bit and the chisel lets the bit remove most of the material BEFORE the chisel starts to cut the rest. Too little distance and a) the bit rubs on the inside of the end of the chisel and b) the chisels is chopping rather thn paring. Too much distance between the bit and the chisel and the bit can wander blowing the mortise AND may bend or break - especially with the 1/4" set.
Try The Forty Cent Method the Fisch guy taught me.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/MChiselBitSettingTrick.html

If you hone the chisel and bit they'll cut a lot better.

charlie b
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Get some decent chisels. Most of the "entry level" morticers come with poor chisels. Some of the cheapest morticers are a bad idea, just because they use a small shoulder size that stops you from buying those good quality but cheap industrial surplus chisels.
Use the "nickel trick" (Google) - You set the chisel up with a small shim (a nickel) under its seat, set the auger to rub against it, then take the shim out and push the chisel back to leave a suitable spacing between chisel and auger.
The vary the thickness of your "nickel" a little, according to the timber you're working. Thick nickels for soft woods.
Make sure your auger and chisel are staying where you left them, especially for the chisel pulling downwards. Listen to the sound of the morticer - if it changes, something has moved.
Be wary of sharpening the chisels - it doesn't need much of it and it's easy to damage them. Cheaper chisels often have poor heat treat and you can work right through the hard layer.
Don't "sharpen" the outside of the chisel. You're just asking for binding problems.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Thanks to each of you for your great advice.
TEF
wrote:

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"TEF" wrote in message

First, notice the slot in the side of the hollow chisel.
When you install the bit and chisel, make sure this opening in the chisel is oriented either right of left, then make your first cut in a location that will insure all subsequent cuts have that opening in the chisel facing the previous cut. This will facilitate the chips being cleared.
It is a good practice with these benchtop machines to make the first and second cut on each end of your proposed mortise, then, as above, cut out the remaining wood, with the slot/opening in the chisel pointing into the previously cut void so that the chips have some place to go.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
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The chips seem to have a tendency

You already got good advice, bu t one thing was left out. Get a narrow file and touch up the bits to sharpen them. From the factory, they leave a lot to be desired. Ed
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