question for pc89x owners

Hi -
Just got a new pc893pk today and mounted the fixed base in my router table (I already love this thing; my 690 was great but this has all the improvements I could want). I set VS to a bit less than 23k, chucked up a 1/8" (1/4" shank) straight solid carbide bit and after cutting about four inches of a 3/16" thick piece of mahogany I went to rotate the collet to line up my next cut. The thing was so hot it practically burned my fingertips! The collet/bit and main shaft were all hot and the motor body was above warm.
I have a 690 but used the new 89x 1/4" collet and two wrenches to cinch it tight. The bit seemed to cut fine and since I'd used it last night with my 690 I'm sure it's plenty sharp. IIRC my 690 collet _never_ got anything more than warm if even that. Anyone know if this is to be expected with the 89x router? If I can I call PC and ask them too but thought I'd check here also.
Mike
--

mikeballard at symbol verizon period net

"If your main parachute fouls, deploy your reserve. If your
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There has been a lot mentioned lately about the heat some of the routers are generating. Seems obvious to me this morning as I just ran my new router yesterday that the fan design may be the answer. I just replaced an older Bosch 1611 router that I have been using for the last 16 years and it did and still does get quite warm to hot. The new router almost seems to cool the air. ;~) How does the air flow from the router fan on your new router compare to your newer router? I would venture to say that my new router triples the air flow through the motor than on my old Bosch. This wind coming out of the new router was the first thing that I noticed when I started it up for the first time. I ran the router for 4 or 5 minutes doing some test cuts and it seemed to still be at room temperature when I turned it off.
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Mike, Texas A & M has solved your parachute problem. It has designed a chute that automatically opens on impact.
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