PVC for air

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Is there any consensus on whether or not to use PVC or CPVC for air lines? My compressor is capable of 150psi. I already have copper for most of my distribution system but I need to add a branch and the copper prices are profanity inducing.
Max
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The consensus in many previous threads is to *never* use PVC for air.
jc

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PVC that gets bumped becomes a schrapnel (sp?) bomb.
Bill in WNC mountains
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...uh, so would you like to provide some context with that?
[I've got quite a few feet of PVC pipe in my drip system that I've bumped a few thousand times and thus far, no shrapnel]
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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wrote:

You might want to keep an eye on it. I have seen it become very brittle and shatter with no air pressure when I was attempting to cut it.
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Only if you fill the cavity with an explosive mixture. Air pressure alone will not have that catastrophic an effect. At worst, the 'shrapnel' will fall at your feet.
Hollywood has completely distorted the concept of 'explosions'.
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Think again. Explosion due to rupture of a vessel containing a compressed gas is extremely violent. High pressure gas cylinders are pressure tested with a non compressible liquid for this reason.

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Don't change the subject with 'high pressure gas cylinders'. Keep the discussion at shop air pressures of max 150 psig.
And I know that a vessel with 3000 psig worth of steam can level a generating station. Boilers can throw an entire ship in the air.....I am talking about 150 psig worth of shop air. I am talking about a garden hose and you're switching the discussion over to the Hoover Dam bursting.
Find me an accident report. No explosive gasses.....air. 150 psig max.
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Robatoy wrote:
> Only if you fill the cavity with an explosive mixture. > Air pressure alone will not have that catastrophic an effect. > At worst, the 'shrapnel' will fall at your feet.
BULL SHIT! !
Lew
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Find me one report/link to an accident that didn't involve air pressures greater than 150 psig or an explosive (oil) mixture.
One!
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Robatoy wrote:
> Find me one report/link to an accident that didn't involve air > pressures greater than 150 psig or an explosive (oil) mixture.
Why would you expect to find reports of something that isn't done?
Lew
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I would like to see a *reliable* report of schedule 40 PVC exploding at an air pressure of 150 psi. Note the "reliable".
Max (who is satisfied that it just might be possible)
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Robatoy wrote:

The very first listing from googling "shop air explosion" revealed one occasion where 140psi of air was accidentally put in a truck tire which then exploded, killing the worker. No explosive mixture... just air pressure less than 150 psi.
http://www.state.nj.us/health/eoh/survweb/01nj108.pdf .
Compressed air is nothing to play with.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
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On Dec 6, 8:40 am, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote:

That's not a shop-air explosion. That is an idiot overinflating a tire. Using that barometer (I made a funny), I am sure there are many air-related accidents. Put 30 psi in your ears, and you'll get hurt. 5 psig through an intravenous needle into your bloodstream and you're toast. How many accidents have been reported where somebody has blown dirt into their eyes? That happens all the time.
Compressed air can hurt you.
I want to see a report where it states that an air distribution line exploded, pvc, copper. rubber... anything. My old shop has a large 3/4" PVC airline distribution system. A dozen drops. Never had an issue for 20 years. Had a crimp come off a cheap airline once.. chased one of the guys around the paintbooth real good.. he had some welts on the back of his legs and a bruised ego..we had a huge laugh...(Could have been more serious, we were lucky.. but you need full-tilt air to blow off dirt particles)
With all due respect,
r
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Robatoy wrote: Had a crimp come off a cheap airline once.. chased one of the

which reminded me....
Same guy took a full swing with a #1 wood at a golf-ball in his tiled bathroom. 33 cuts, 112 contusions and 44 lacerations. Good thing his roommate heard the commotion and opened the door to let the ball out.
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Bright fellow, no?
Patriarch
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If you hadn't found any such reports... it's because you didn't look. This is the very *first* hit turned up by a Google search on <"compressed air" pvc explosion>
Here ya go... http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19880520.html
Here's another: http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/ezine/archive/159/readers.cfm
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Of course he didn't look. He was hoping you wouldn't, either. Now he's probably going to claim these don't count because the ambient temperature was beyond parameters, or it was the wrong phase of the moon, or whatever.
You can rub this one all day but you can't put a polish on a turd. PVC line for compressed gases is a dangerous game. Just because he's gotten away with it for a lengthy period of time doesn't mean it's not ready to fail later today... or tomorrow... with disasterous results.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
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Robatoy wrote:

<http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19880520.html
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B A R R Y wrote:

With all due deference, the operating pressure of the exploded line was not given. However, there is no reason for presuming that it exceeded the pressure under discussion, either. Moreover, further down in the page a restriction of 100 psi was imposed ... well below your postulated 150 psi.
One of the additional links DID relate specifically to shop-level pressure and a couple of clearly dangerous failures.
ABS, apparently, ruptures. PVC, just as apparently, shatters rather dramatically.
Under the banner of erring on the side of caution, would it not make sense to eschew pvc in favor of one of the other, commonly used, materials?
Your pvc has flexed each time the pressure has changed. That's a lot of cycles over the lifetime you told us about. The course of prudence would be to at least shield it.
Bill
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