Pneumatic Staple Gun

Many years ago I purchased a porch swing or glider. The seat part hangs on 4 chains about 12 inches long. The fastners for most of the swing are staples and a few bolts. The swing has lasted so long I wan't to copy it for my new back porch.
I have never owned a staple gun so I am looking for some advice on which one to purchase for home use. Most of the fastening will be 3/4 to 3/4 Cyprus wood except for the seat and back which are 1/4 in. thick slats. Any input on which size staples to use?
Thanks in advance for any help.
Virgle
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Just a thought here, if you are going to all the trouble to build a duplicate why not use screws in stead of staples? I built a porch swing many years ago and it is a lot if work. I counter sank the screws and plugged them.
Staple gun, I have just about one of each type pneumatic fastener for wood working that there is available, including a stapler. This tool that is now about 4 years old and resides among pneumatic nailers that are 20 years old very seldom gets used. I bought it for 1 job and paid about $30 for it. Because I reasoned that I would seldom use the tool I went with the cheap Harbor Freight model. Additionally for this type work you probably want the narrow crown variety vs. the type that shoots 1/2" wide staples similar to those used in the typical hand operated staple gun.
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Leon wrote: why not use screws in stead of staples? I built a porch swing

including multiples of some kinds. But for your application I would also use screws. If you staple with the grain, you may have a split or two, especially near the end of a board. If you staple across the grain, the fibers under the crown must crush if the staple is to be driven flush. That could look unsightly and may raise undesirable splinters. You may want to consider drilling countersunk pilot holes for screws instead. I'd lay out the screws symmetrically and not countersink the screws on the narrow stock.
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I have a stapler from porter cable... I use it mostly for doing uphostry work. It will drive the staple into oak, so im sure it will work for Cyprus.
Randy http://nokeswoodworks.com
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Screws probably the best idea.
Heres a review of a pneumatic stapler that may help: http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/portercableNS150A.htm
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Dean Bielanowski
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Thanks to all who responded. 100% said screws. Even a 73 yr. old hard head like me can't fight those odds.
Screws and plugs it is for all but the seat and back which are 1/4 X 1 1/2. This appears to me to be too thin for counter sunk screws. I suppose I could use screws and just flush them.
Virgle
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just flush them > Virgle
I have a little Bostich 1/4" crown stapler that does fin save 1 glaring deficiency - no depth adjustment!
Do NOT BUY a stapler, nail gun W/O the ability to adjust the depth/ penetration!
Splitting is as likely with a nail gun as with a simple nail unless you are pre-dilling the holes. :Crushing" the grain under teh crown of the staple is similar to the crushed grain under a nail head, no? It happens.
Attaching 1/4" sock with screws that are counter-sunk an plugged will be quite a feat. I think I would use 3/4" staples and a dab of exterior glue. (And I have to employ tricks to get the depth / penetration "proud" then tap them in flush with a hammer. I believe you can get stainless steel staples, but if the original bench got by without them so will your replica.
Some of the adherence to "old world" and traditional fastening approaches makes lots of sense. But, I suspect some of those guys in early American History would have loved a nail gun and a chain saw!
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"Virgle" wrote:

1/4 doesn't provide enough material for plugs; however, flathead BRONZE screws can be very attractive, especially on cypress in an exterior application.
Lew
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stapler. Well Lew the swing or glider is over 20 years old and still solid. It is built our of yellow pine but I treat it every year. The staples on the seat and back part don't look bad but will probably go with screws. The local sawmill went out of business and I purchased 2 pickup truck loads of cyprus at a very good price.
Thanks again Virgle
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