Plywood edging -- iron on or?

I just had a post on finishing edges but I forgot to ask --
Do they make the plywood edging that is NOT the iron on type?
I've had good luck in the past working with formica edges using contact cement and was wondering if you can do that with plywood edges as well? (like walnut etc).
Seems it would be a better grip -- I've had trouble with the iron on stuff being a tiny bit loose in places.
Just buy regular veneer and use contact cement?
Thanks.
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The iron on stuff works fine, if it's reasonable quality, your edges are clean and smooth, and you apply the right amount of heat for the right amount of time. I don't see a benefit in using contact cement.
Robatoy _finally_ made a New Years' resolution to make the fookin' edge-banding tutorial he's promised for so long. Should be ready by, what?, the end of the month at the latest.
R
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I dont really see plain veneer any more for this purpose, but I only buy from one location when I do buy. I have not had any problems with the iron on using my wife's iron.... Hope she does not see this. Sewing stores sell a plastic like pad that you can put between the iron and the veneer/material/cloth. It helps to give more even heat, helps to prevent scorching, and helps the iron slip along the wood/material/cloth a little easier. My wife is a quilter so you probably have to look into a specialty quilting store.
If you want to glue it on your self that would work also but would be considerably more work and if I were to go to the trouble to add the glue to the veneer I think I would opt to glueing on a thicker solid edge rather than a thin veneer.
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Sure, just 'wood tape' form veneer. I've seen it, don't know exactly where to buy this week (or online).

Yep, it works fine. I used a (disposable, of course) paint roller to apply the cement, and a razor knife followed by sandpaper to smooth the edge.
You can make your own iron-on, too; prep the surface with a thin film of white glue, do the same to the veneer, and let it dry (takes at least a couple of days, you DON'T want the veneer to have high moisture content at application time). Then iron it down (the heat will activate the glue).
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mkr5000 wrote:

You could always make your own, just rip off what you need from a board.
The only time I use the iron on is when using polyester/PVC edging; otherwise I do as above, coat the edge of where it goes - be sure it is smooth - with white PVA glue, let it dry then iron on my piece (PVA is thermoplastic). Works fine up to veneer of about 1/8" thickness.
I use contact cement if I'm using a piece of laminate for the edging, prefer the white glue for wood...less "touchy" :)
--

dadiOH
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On Mon, 11 Jan 2010 10:38:46 -0800 (PST), the infamous mkr5000

Yes, the local hardwoods guy has bare oak, birch, and a few other flavors of wood in 1" strip for edgebanding, sold in 50 foot lengths.

I wouldn't use contact cement, I'd use yellow glue, but only after sanding or planing the edges to make sure there wasn't much glue on them.
-- What helps luck is a habit of watching for opportunities, of having a patient, but restless mind, of sacrificing one's ease or vanity, of uniting a love of detail to foresight, and of passing through hard times bravely and cheerfully. -- Charles Victor Cherbuliez
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make some strips by resawing some 3/16 then plane them down to 1/8 nail them on with 23 ga nails and use TIII glue. Trim with CMT flush trim cutter. They make a bit that has a bit of shear to them. They work very well.
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I have always had good luck using contact glue on 1/8 strips of solid. Just coat the plywood and the wood strip. Let it dry and place it on the plywood. Use a rubber mallet to pound the strip firmly on to the plywood edge. Use a with a formica bit to trim of the little excess that you will have on 3/4 plywood. Sand a bit and it will look like a solid piece of wood. I have a wall unit that I made over 25 years ago and it still looks fine.
Al
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One way to improve your results with iron-on edging is to joint the edge of your plywood. Don't take it to your jointer though, unless you have carbide knives. Take it to your router table and with a straight bit take of just a 32nd (so shim the outfeed fence by a 32nd too). This gives you a really smooth, square surface and I've found the edging goes on much better. Also, I have a piece of steel that I rub over the edging immediately after I apply it to mush it totally flat and set the glue. I think it helps.
JP
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